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Aethelbert

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About Aethelbert

  • Rank
    Executive Member
  • Birthday 09/22/1943

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    Aethelbert_43

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    North Carolina
  • Interests
    Firearms; Hiking; Music; Astronomy; Poetry
  1. Aethelbert

    Tapco down?

    Worked fine for me just a moment ago
  2. I fully agree with 1911 -- those were not game birds. One even had what appeared to be a fledgling with it on the ground when he shot. When he zeroed his camera in on a tallish bird strutting slowly through the marshly part, I couldn't bear to watch him kill a protected wetlands type bird, too, and had to turn the video off. This kind of guy gives us all a bad name as gun owners and/or hunters. I also agree that his guns should be taken away from him.
  3. Aethelbert

    I'm off to Kommiefornia!!

    Congrats, Marine and fellow Saiga enthusiast! May your marriage be as blessed as mine has been and continues to be after 27 years!
  4. Understnd that the barrels of the Austro-Hungarian M-95 Steyr were (at least in the early days) stainless which was one beast to work with in the 1890's. Also, that the Sons of Nippon also hard chromed the bores of their 6.5 Arisaka rifles which helped later with their maintenance in the jungles of the Pacific islands. I could be wrong, though -- just don't let my wife know because I've almost got her convinced that I know everything that's gun-related and that what I don't know I can find out from the Cobra... I would go for one with the hard chrome.
  5. Understnd that the barrels of the Austro-Hungarian M-95 Steyr were (at least in the early days) stainless which was one beast to work with in the 1890's. Also, that the Sons of Nippon also hard chromed the bores of their 6.5 Arisaka rifles which helped later with their maintenance in the jungles of the Pacific islands. I could be wrong, though -- just don't let my wife know because I've almost got her convinced that I know everything that's gun-related and that what I don't know I can find out from the Cobra...
  6. Naw. Not a thing -- 'cept maybe the safety? And then only if you intend to actually fire the thing which might not necessarily be wise considering: (1) the enclosed area and (2) the rifle is awfully close to being in line with the head of the guy sitting there in the room and not all that much ahead of the muzzle. Liked the pic.
  7. Aethelbert

    Our Real Roots...

    well, i do believe it became a little harder lately, but not by incredibly much. well, displaying your weapons while eating or even just drinking is "not done" here. the law doesn't allow it. also, have you ever been to the large ranges in Switzerland? now THAT is class. german ranges look meager compared to those. they're totally awesome. not only do they have a lot of long ranges (up to a mile or so), but they also have indoor (read UNDERGROUND carved into the mountain) ranges with 300m ranges, with -obviously- no wind at all. and coupled to that a nice bar and a restaurant. it's great, i wish we had stuff like that. as a sidenote: how is your health holding up? i hope you're doing ok. SuA -- Those ranges in Switzerland sound fabulous! You are absolutely correct when you say that the German sport hotels with their ranges are, indeed meager and that's even without being compared to the Swiss ranges you describe. I used only the pistol ranges and they were limited to 25 meters. As where you are, displaying your weapon while eating or even just drinking is not permitted. You used to be able to have them at you table provided they were properly enclosed in a gun case. Health-wise? It's a long, sometimes hard haul but progress is being made. I thank you for asking. BTW, I recall going to Antwerpen (Antwerp) and getting a delicious brew called Martin's Pale Ale. Brewed in England, shipped in large kegs to the Rotterdam where it was bottled. Used to be able to get it near the train station. The color of deep, rich mahongany, it had a head of foam that seemingly would never go away. Delicious! Drink one? Do so slowly. It is a very heavy brew. One will not intoxicate but will stay with you for quite awhile.
  8. Aethelbert

    Our Real Roots...

    well, i do believe it became a little harder lately, but not by incredibly much. well, displaying your weapons while eating or even just drinking is "not done" here. the law doesn't allow it. also, have you ever been to the large ranges in Switzerland? now THAT is class. german ranges look meager compared to those. they're totally awesome. not only do they have a lot of long ranges (up to a mile or so), but they also have indoor (read UNDERGROUND carved into the mountain) ranges with 300m ranges, with -obviously- no wind at all. and coupled to that a nice bar and a restaurant. it's great, i wish we had stuff like that. as a sidenote: how is your health holding up? i hope you're doing ok. SuA -- Those ranges in Switzerland sound fabulous! You are absolutely correct when you say that the German sport hotels with their ranges are, indeed meager and that's even without being compared to the Swiss ranges you describe. I used only the pistol ranges and they were limited to 25 meters. As where you are, displaying your weapon while eating or even just drinking is not permitted. You used to be able to have them at you table provided they were properly enclosed in a gun case. Health-wise? It's a long haul but progress is being made. I thank you for asking. BTW, I recall going to Antwerpen (Antwerp) and getting a delicious brew called Martin's Pale Ale. Brewed in England, shipped in large kegs to the Rotterdam where it was bottled. Used to be able to get it near the train station. They color of deep, rich mahongany, it had a head of foam that seemingly would never go away. Delicious! Drink one? Do so slowly. It is a very heavy brew. One will not intoxicate but will stay with youfor quite awhile.
  9. Aethelbert

    Our Real Roots...

    well, i do believe it became a little harder lately, but not by incredibly much. well, displaying your weapons while eating or even just drinking is "not done" here. the law doesn't allow it. also, have you ever been to the large ranges in Switzerland? now THAT is class. german ranges look meager compared to those. they're totally awesome. not only do they have a lot of long ranges (up to a mile or so), but they also have indoor (read UNDERGROUND carved into the mountain) ranges with 300m ranges, with -obviously- no wind at all. and coupled to that a nice bar and a restaurant. it's great, i wish we had stuff like that. as a sidenote: how is your health holding up? i hope you're doing ok. SuA -- Those ranges in Switzerland sound fabulous! You are absolutely correct when you say that the German sport hotels with their ranges are, indeed meager and that's even without being compared to the Swiss ranges you describe. I used only the pistol ranges and they were limited to 25 meters. As where you are, displaying your weapon while eating or even just drinking is not permitted. You used to be able to have them at you table provided they were properly enclosed in a gun case. Health-wise? It's a long haul but progress is being made. I thank you for asking. BTW, I recall going to Antwerpen (Antwerp) and getting a delicious brew called Martin's Pale Ale. Brewed in England, shipped in large kegs to the Rotterdam where it was bottled. Used to be able to get it near the train station. They color of deep, rich mahongany, it had a head of foam that seemingly would never go away. Delicious! Drink one? Do so slowly. It is a very heavy brew. One will not intoxicate but will stay with youfor quite awhile.
  10. Yes at this present time they are quite different. And I hope they stay so. But if these checkpoint type events like in DC keep occurring, how long will it be before the similarities, at least in the justifications, increase? Okay. I surrender. I wouldn't want to see it here in the USA. In Italy they have tradions dating back to the independence of their nation from Spain, Austro-Hungary, etc, which have governed just how the military kept the peace. Remembering, too, that they did not have a tradition of local police (IIRC). Our military does not have such a tradition. The one place, the one city in the US that had such experience would probably have been New Orleans during the occupation toward the end of the War Between the States. And that was marked by brutal behavior on the part of the troops with the extremely active encouragement of their commanding general. With no background in civilian law enforcement, with the vast bulk of their training to do as we see them in videos from Iraq and Afganistan where such activity is necessary (it is, they are after all war zones), there is simply too much likelihood that they will behave as they have trained -- especially if things get dicey. Of course, they could help change the balance of things along the shared southern border where things sometimes see Mexican troops crossing our border with full auto weapons and where, at one point, forced the AZ Nat'l Guard to give up an observation post (the NG had but ordered to not return fire) but in the bulk of the US? Our police are already being militarized more than I, personally, have any desire to see. Hmm. If the police become much more militarized with every little burg and 'Holler' having their own black-uniformed SWAT armed with auto weapons and .50 BMG (when's the last time anyone used an APC to rob a convenience store?) then we might be better off having under military command... Bear in mind, please, that anything said about our men and women in uniform are not meant to take away from them or from what they are doing to preserve our nation's freedom and security. As a 15-year veteran (mostly 3d AR BDE/3D AR DIV/ 1/36 Inf Regmt and proud of it and the men and women with whom I served), I believe in them. End of rant
  11. Aethelbert

    Our Real Roots...

    i own 4 right now, with 2 more down the pipe by the end of the year. what's your point? While I have only been to Belgium a very few times and am, admittedly, lacking in gun law knowledge of the Belgiques, I lived for many years in Das Bundesrepublik Deutschland and was always impressed by their gun laws. Go to the proper admin office of the Polizei, fill out the forms and -- voila! -- you then have your waffenerwerbschein -- your purchase permit. Very similar to the pistol permit we get here in NC. You can then go to the gun shop and buy your handgun. Forgot -- you also get your waffenschein which is your permit to actually possess the gun. To buy ammo, although it requires another permit (the munitionerwerbschein or ammunition acquisition permit), it's no big deal. All in all, probably easier than in NY City, Chicago or SanFrancisco. Adding to the beauty of it are the 'sport' hotels scattered across the country where you can stay and also use their on-site pistol/rifle ranges and then enjoy a meal... with your firearms and ammo at the table!
  12. Aside from the differrence in uniform, the 'civilian' police walking a beat in Italy are actually a branch of the military. It's also the military who fight the poachers in the mountains and forests of Italy and try to stem the tide of smugglers. My wife lived in Vicenza (near Venice) and taught me that bit of Italian reality. So, it doesn't bother me. Besides, the laws and the situation in Italy are not the same as here in the USA.
  13. Juggernaut -- You are definitely in my prayers. May God send his healing presence to you.
  14. Ah, yes. The Forbin Project.
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