Jump to content

gunfun

Contributor
  • Content count

    8,932
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    72

gunfun last won the day on August 31

gunfun had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

3,871 Excellent

About gunfun

  • Rank
    Apparently, guy who has made way too many posts.

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCokyEtnWCHKnIfs3bRX7QLw

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington

Recent Profile Visitors

1,265 profile views
  1. Oh, the other thing about the festiva, was it was night and day in feel and performance, and economy at some undefined weight threshold. I could have a passenger or two, and it was the same as always. If I had my dad in there, who is a big guy, the thing was just struggling, and it was like a completely different car.
  2. I'm nothing special. I don't know much about the TDI, but I was impressed. feel free to be skeptical, I'm just reporting what I found on the trips I used it on. I enjoyed the car and was sad to see it die. As for the festiva, they came in with several different engines, and I had whichever the good one was with a 5 speed. We had a couple others in the family which were not as good, and one which was the same. The autos were garbage. I did a test driving for about a month and a half using 87 gas from arco, and ditto from the chevron which was at the time 10 cents more a gallon even. My cost per mile was identical, but the car ran way better on the chevron. I tried to not change my driving habits. So I do think fuel makes a big difference with some cars. I was a more economical driver then than I am now, but it really was a good car for me. Most of my cars since have been around 30-32 mpg most of the time. The car that really surprised me was driving a late model very borrowed loaded outback and getting 36+ mpg per the display while going over mountain passes and being kinda aggressive. I had noted mileage, and when I did the math for the trip it came out exactly what the display claimed. Older versions of the same car with less refined transmissions were much cruder and get rather dismal economy. I still don't see how they managed to get that much mpg out of such a heavy rig.
  3. reliable economy is a very freeing feature. Most of my friends got 4wd suvs for the feeling of being down for adventure. I always had econo boxes. My first car was even a ford festiva which was a better car than you would think. 55/45 mpg in a car you could afford that lasts for 450k miles and isn't made of lithium. then a crappy saturn, and then a protege 5 speed which I still have and like. It is more like 30-32 MPG most of the time, but if I am going over mountian roads at about 60, even if the car is working hard, my mpg goes closer to 42. It's getting pretty shabby due to the interfaces with antler bearing quadropeds screwing up the looks and the rear dampers are gone from having some very fat people in the back going too fast down Forrest service roads. At this point it would be dumb to dump a lot of cash into it, but it has been a great car for me. My friends always wanted to do road trips, then debated about pooling money for gas for their explorer or trailblazer or whatever. "We can go to X for the weekend, if we get another person to cram in, the gas will be $35 each..." I'd say, "let's just go. We'll take my car, and the gas will be under $35 round trip. Jump in and don't worry about chipping in on gas." economy is freedom to do what you want as often as you want. So is having a car that you don't mind getting a scratch on. I think my next car is likely to be a subaru hatch, or wagon, so I won't be as economical, but most of the miles go on two wheels the last few years anyway.
  4. gunfun

    Muzzle Brake: possible DIY?

    have your i.d. Close to bore diameter. Slots or holes work, but it's a matter of surface area that is perpendicular or more aggresive to bore, which is exposed to high pressure gasses. Pressure drops off rapidly after the first port or two. So those ports need to be designed to do the most work. Sometimes I see brakes with a few holes and then big ol slots, which is backward. A few slots close together, with enough meat in the remaining material to take the thrust of the gasses they are turning will do more than a lot of holes. My preference is angled gills and enclosed bottom. Gills need to leave stock that is somewhere around 3/16" thick between them. Also you are basically making a high pressure whistle. The shape of the vents will affect the tone, but I don't know how to predict what a less obnoxious design would be. You will probably see gas cutting and wear on the i.d. where it is doing the most work. Cut the same thing in steel, and it will do fine. People kind of make these into super high tech magic, but there are plenty of chineseum brakes that do fine in mystery steel at ~$20 each. Be sure to have clean threads with full engagement. Every bit of recoil the brake absorbs is basically thrust tugging on the end of your barrel. shallow thread engagement is a great way to strip the threading on the barrel. It needs to be solidly enough mounted that you would trust repeated slide hammer blows to never move it.
  5. I like them, but post dieselgate, VW has basically said that they can't afford to start making them again. My grampa had a 98 jetta that someone had worked over. It was fast, fun when it hit turbo, and I got 65mpg flogging it through twisty backwoods roads. Unfortunately, it had a VW transmission, which is the failure mode. I don't know what was done to it, but I am fairly sure that it had upgraded suspension and some engine mods, and probably upsized tires. I've driven gas jettas, and they felt way more understeer prone, even with what must be lighter engine blocks.
  6. He never did stand up for conservative issues, because he wasn't. He was big on defense, and that was the one point of intersection. I never liked or trusted him, but I hope I'm wrong about his ultimate destination.
  7. Think of it as cheap preventative-medicine lawyering, rather than the expensive cleaning up a cancerous mess after it is probably too late kind.
  8. For him to protect his patentability, he would need (not want. Need) a written NDA. Prior disclosure can be an absolute bar to patent. Mike needs a standard NDA form based on the work he does. It's also a good tool to keep excited inventors thinking straight about what to do and not do while fundraising, etc.
  9. I hope this picture doesn't constitute evidence of a breach of your agreement with mossberg, Mike. I'd hate to have you get burned on something like that. If you are worried about recoil, why not tack on a reinforcement plat in the critical areas? Did you have to cut a lot of meat out of the mag itself? Also, why
  10. None taken. I don't like paying gunsmiths either. There's a few things which I would pay them to do for me, most of which involve tools I don't have, or trial and error I can't afford the error on. Some things I could do, but just aren't exciting enough to offset the time and tool expense vs having someone else do it. Skilled work is skilled work, and there are diminishing returns in trying to be master level skilled at everything for yourself.
  11. He's a good guy. Not infallible, but I suppose that goes both ways. What are you saying caused the double feed? If you are saying his explanation is wrong, then it helps if you give your explanation in detail too.
  12. gunfun

    Saiga 12 Bolt Head Damage

    If my phone wasn't out of order, I would take a picture of mine to show what I mean.
  13. gunfun

    Saiga 12 Bolt Head Damage

    This feels like a comedy routine. At least one of us in this thread has a name like Zeppo or Groucho.... I'm sure of it. Turn the straight edge 90* about its axis so that it is edge on to the receiver. The way you are holding it, your hand can flex it, thus negating its purpose. It helps if the light source primarily is from underneath the straight edge so that you only see light where the contact is interrupted. Hold the gun up to the light with a straight edge as described and you will see what I mean. That will inform your picture taking. p.s. Don't get the idea that I am picking on you. You are asking reasonable questions and making honest attempts to provide the information requested. In short, you are trying to help others help you. Good job. That's actually a very rare thing.
  14. I'm okay with that, so long as it is designed to be a simple shotgun with a compact action. i.e. not a long pump action with the usual clockwork pinball machine inside. There is no good reason for why a shotgun should have any more moving parts than a military carbine. Nor should it be more complex.
  15. gunfun

    Saiga 12 Bolt Head Damage

    That's what he was asking for, but it would be even better if the picture showed holding a straight edge against the receiver flat surfaces. The amount of daylight showing through gaps is a lot easier to get a clear read on than a visual estimation of straight. Especially since some cameras have a fisheye effect (& maybe digital correction of same.)
×