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my762buzz

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Everything posted by my762buzz

  1. VHT FLAMEPROOF™ COATING VHT FlameProof™ Coating will renew and extend the life of any surface exposed to extremely high temperatures. This unique coating is a matte finish, silicone ceramic base widely used by the automotive industry on exhaust systems and the aerospace industry for jet engines, re-entry vehicles and other high temperature applications. VHT FlameProof™ Coating will withstand temperatures up to 2000°F (1093°C) and is ideal for use on headers, exhaust systems, or wherever an extreme temperature coating is needed. Temperature: 1300°F-2000°F (704°C-1093°C) Applications: H
  2. I used it on a bolt gun. It does not seem impervious to alcohol or acetone. I honestly have not heated it because heat is not needed to apply it. I am willing to bet that temperatures above 400 F will ruin it sooner than later. A much easier and cheaper coating for high temperature is either VHT 1300-2000 header paint.
  3. Did you mean "Red Hammer"? It is 125 gr with laquer finish. Barnaul
  4. I seriously doubt KVAR will get new spare bolts from Russia. That would be a miracle.
  5. Bolts or carriers never hardly, but firing pins occasionally break and springs wear out. Extra firing pins and springs like the disconnector, hammer, and extractor are a good idea. Maybe I am paranoid. I got a dozen extra of each just in case. You never know when spare parts might become impossible to get due to our government's useless laws. I suggested to KVAR a few weeks ago about having a sale on parts and they had a fantastic sale last weekend. Up to 70% off on many things. I got several of the kvar sale spare parts for my Saiga and Vepr rifles. If I don't need them years from
  6. Just curious to know what you don't like about it.. I've got the same one, and I actually like it quite a bit. I shoot it with most of the rubber covers off though.. think its too wide with them on. I did a similar one earlier this year. The arm is solid dupont Rhinite.
  7. Very funny. Everyone knows you only need that with AR's. Possible pending sale on another board. Will update accordingly.
  8. Withdrawn. I bought it new/unfired and only put less than 100 rounds of wolf ammo through it to sight it in. It has a tapco G2 trigger group but I can also include the original chinese trigger group. It has an IronWood walnut buttstock but I do have the original chinese thumbhole stock. It has a tapco saw grip and a choate handguard. The upgrades alone cost $100 and allow for a legal Title 18 922r Federally compliant pistol grip configuration. This MAK90 is in excellent overall condition. Prefer not to ship. $600 FTF in SC more pictures are available upon req
  9. Don't forget. Spare saiga bolts will still require headspace checking with a gauge.
  10. Here we have a Vepr (AK 103 style bolt), Saiga (AK 103 style bolt), and an SSR 85 (AK 47/AKM style bolt). All 3 bolts compared. As you can see, the AK47 pattern bolt has a shorter bolt head and a different extractor profile. The AK47 pattern bolt does not fit the saiga carrier. They do not interchange at all. The stems are very different. The AK47 pattern bolt stem is obviously larger. This is how far the AK 47 pattern carrier makes it into the saiga rear sight block and gas tube. The top of the carrier appears to be rubbing the sight
  11. Have a gunsmith work on it or buy some gauges and carefully follow the directions. http://www.surplusrifle.com/shooting/headspace/index.asp Excessive Headspace Excessive headspace allows movement of the case during firing. This can cause case stretching, case separation (ruptured case), and gas leakage. When the powder is ignited the base of the cartridge can move back while the sides of the case stick to the walls of the chamber. As a result the case can separate and rupture. If the bolt and receiver are not strong enough to contain and vent the blast you can at the very least damage the f
  12. Tromix, I'd imagine he would want a minimum order of maybe 1000 per unit. A machined bolt is not going to be cheap. I'm not sure people are going to want to pay $100 for a spare machined bolt, if it's even possible at that price and then it has to be properly headspaced to your barrel or this can happen.
  13. See post #10 of this thread. From Kvar. Yes, it was drop in. It fit my saiga bolt perfectly.
  14. I got to test the ak74 firing pin today. I shot 100 wolf military classic rounds through it. All of them fired just fine. No pierced primers. No problems at all.
  15. If that aligns perfectly with the breech face and clears the ejector, then it might work. Yes, any bolt replacement should be checked for head space even if it was a saiga factory exact replacement. Using an improperly headspaced bolt can result in high pressure gases and maybe steel bits flying at your face.
  16. No. The exact parts would be from the ak103 and ak104. http://www.izhmash.ru/eng/product/ak103.shtml This is the factory gun. from Wiki The AK-103 is a modern, Russian-designed version of the famous AKM assault rifle, chambered for the 7.62x39mm M43 round. It combines the AKM design with developments from the AK-74 and AK-74M, with the use of plastics to replace metal or wooden components wherever possible to reduce overall weight. The AK-103 can be fitted with a variety of sights, including laser, night vision, and telescopic sights, plus a suppressor and the GP-30 grenade la
  17. I called Kvar (AKA Arsenal's surplus parts) I spoke to sales and a production tech. No parts will be flowing in. I'm not sure there has ever been spare bolts, extractors, and firing pins from any Saiga importer in the past. If my bolt cracks today from fatigue, RAA would hopefully replace my whole gun or I guess Tom Cole of Cadiz (RAA warantee service) might have to headspace a replacement bolt, but I'm not sure either way. If my extractor chips, then again not sure what next. If some future antigun politician stops all semiauto guns and parts imports like Clinton did with China, then n
  18. What I was thinking about is the fact that the AK-74 has a tighter arc (smaller radius) than the 7.62 x 39 extractor. In other words, the 7.62 x 39 extractor has the same arc as the recess in the 7.62 x 39 cartridge case. On the other hand, the AK-74 extractor has a different arc to match the 5.45 x 39 cartridge case. I think this causes the tips of the AK-74 extractor to dig into the 7.62 x 39 case while the middle of the AK-74 extractor would not be as snug against the 7.62 x 39 case. I believe this is the cause of the "chewed up" cartridge rims that I mentioned earlier when I manually f
  19. No. Its an ak 74 bolt in 7.62x39. It uses an ak74 type extractor and firing pin. A regular ak 47 7.62x39 type will not fit. The size is different. Ak 103 bolt (74 style in 7.62x39) might be exact but no one sells surplus 103 bolts that I know of. I am not sure if Kvar or anyone has ever sold them.
  20. I compared the saiga factory firing pin with a surplus ak74 firing pin. I couldn't see any real difference. I inserted the surplus ak74 (5.45)firing pin in my saiga 7.62x39 bolt and it fit perfect. I examined the pin protruding into the breach face and it worked flawlessly. I left the surplus pin in my bolt and and hammered the retaining pin, and it fit fine. I am going to live fire my saiga with the replacement firing pin when I get a chance next week. I doubt that it will pierce a primer even with a smaller frontal contact surface, but I will check the primers from the fired cases
  21. The extractor has a stressful task. I can't imagine mild low carbon steel being used. I would think high carbon steel should be the material. Therefore, if so, through hardened. A dremel might be just the thing to shave off 1mm of claw. Keeping the correct blade angle on the shortened claw is important too.
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