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Squeaky

Ensuring custom rifle accuracy?

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Hello Folks:

In a previous post, I announced I am getting components to build a bolt-action .308 rifle using McMillan's A-4 gunstock. My question is once I get all the parts, what operations need to be done by a gunsmith to ensure fit and accuracy?

I know one needs to test the chamber with go/no-go gauges.

I've heard of trueing/blueprinting a receiver. Are these synonymous terms or are they different operations? Is it really necessary?

I intend to do a glass bedding job to. What exactly gets bedded? Just the receiver? I assume with a free-floating barrel you don't glass bed the barrel.

I've also heard of pillaring. What does that involve? My bottom metal will come with two pillars and screws for fitting it under the receiver. Is that what folks are referring to when they "pillar" a rifle?

Should both glass bedding and pillaring be done to enhance accuracy?

Anything else?

I just don't want to leave out anything and have my gunsmith assume I didn't want something done because I didn't know to request it, and go to the range and have disappointing accuracy after spending lots of $$$ on a rifle build.

Thanks guys.

 

 

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19 hours ago, Squeaky said:

I've heard of trueing/blueprinting a receiver. Are these synonymous terms or are they different operations? Is it really necessary?

 

There is a small difference. Blue printing is making the whole receiver precisely conform to the dimensions as claimed in the drawings. Since you can't add material, this is generally at the small end of the dimensional tolerance allowed.

 

Truing would be a part of that, but not necessarily the whole thing. Generally truing means getting something straight or square. In the case of rifle truing, that's generally getting the barrel on axis with the reciever, and making sure it is fully supported by contact with all the bearing surfaces, which are also either concentric or perpendicular to the line of the bore. Usually also the bolt face and lugs. So you could get the areas that matter, and ignore the other spots. Possibly supporting contact with crooked metal by inletting the stock to fit, or using glass filled epoxy to match whatever irregular shape it happens to be.

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