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Makc

Installing the Buffer on Saiga Shotgun

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NO TOOLS ARE NEEDED!!!

 

1. Mentaly prepare yourself by looking at the part!!! :lolol::lolol::lolol:

 

2. Slide the front part of the spring forward off the rod.

 

3. Slide the cover forward completely off the rod.

 

4. Install the Buffer.

 

5. Slide the Buffer all the way back.

 

6. Install the cover back on the rod.

 

7. Install the front part of the spring back on the rod.

 

The whole operation should take you less then a minute if you are doing it the first time!!! :super:

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in theory, It keeps the BCG from striking the rear of the receiver

Or at least absorbs a lot of the energy before it does.

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I installed one on an FEG AK and one on a Mini-14.

 

With the buffers installed, the Mini would frequently fail to feed (failed to pick up the next round, bolt fully forward empty chamber, rounds still in the mag). The AK was also having frequent FTF's.

 

After removing buffers, both rifles are 100% reliable.

 

I also installed buffers in a CETME and PTR-91 with no problems.

 

YMMV.

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Agree with above. Buffers are well known for causing cycling problems, but it varies from firearm to firearm. Removal often fixes the problem.

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So none of y'all use recoil buffers? It sounded like those incidents were isolated to the CETME. I wouldn't think that a buffer in an AK would screw anything up. The only thing to ruin would be rivets holding the rear of the receiver together. But even then, the rear of the receiver gets more direct punishment of metal slamming against metal if there isn't a buffer.

 

What's the deal?

 

UPDATE 1:

 

I went here: http://www.thehighro...ad.php?t=284603

and here: http://www.surplusri...pic.php?t=31796

 

And I read dstorm1911's post about half-way down the page. Someone should notify people here on the board of the ineffectiveness of recoil buffers, if they don't know already.

 

In fact, if the info's correct, they aid the wearing and destruction of the rear trunnion and its rivets! :ded: Wow! I am totally removing all the recoil buffers in my guns! :eek:

 

Someone should make a sticky for this subject in every section.

 

UPDATE 2:

 

Allright, time to humble myself. It seems I've pulled a "Chicken Little" on this one.

 

To tell y'all the truth, I use recoil buffers in most of my AKs, and it seems that my .223 and x39 guns don't seem to really need a recoil buffer. But they probably wouldn't suffer from having I thin one to suck up the slop of the bolt carrier. And now that I think of it logically, if you do want to test your gun, like its been said before, try putting some masking tape on the rear trunnion and firing it. If its obvious that the bolt carrier is hitting the rear trunnion, try replacing the recoil spring, or try getting a thin recoil buffer like the ones from BlackJack. Or do both! Get a new spring, AND a BlackJack buffer. I've always run the thin BlackJack green ones. They're affordable, and hey, it stimulates the economy!

 

In fact, after going over all my guns, I realize that I've never used a recoil buffer in my Saiga-12, but it's the one gun I own that needs one the most. I've run every kind of bird shot, buck shot and slug through that baby, and after actually looking at the rear trunnion compared to my other guns, it looks like I took a roofing hammer to it. Even the rear trunnion on my old SAR-1 that's had 10,000+ rounds through it doesn't look as bad. So, I'll be putting a buffer in my '12, and I'd deffinitely recommend a buffer for your Saiga 12, or your 20 or 410.

 

As far as being wary of the rear trunnion comming apart because of an extra quarter-inch of soft rubber between the back of the gun and the bolt carrier, forget about it! These rifles are made it RUSSIA, with hard Russian steel. Have you looked at the rear trunnion of your Saigas lately? Look at the thickness of the receiver. Now look at the rivets that go through the reciver and into the rear trunnion, holding it in place. Those damn rivets are pounded in there so tight, they make that heavy Russian steel bend inward toward the center of the rivet. Now that is solid construction. That is a Kalashnikov. These rifles were made by Izhmash, for Chrissakes! You might expect rivets to pop out and shear off in some poopy Romanian rifle, but not these. These rifles are solid Russian weaponry.

 

So, in essence, this is what my original post should have been about, sifting the truth out of the bullshit, and coming to a logical and educated conclusion about recoil buffers:

 

1.) Recoil buffers definitely help in a Saiga 12, 20 or 410.

2.) They do not help any in an HK91/G3/CETME (Those aren't even AKs, but thanks anyway for the info nalioth).

3.) In every other AK-based rifle, it is a personal preference. Some rifles will need 'em, some may not. Its all up to you.

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I have a much better idea. Why don't we sticky this post in the TRASH CAN in stead? :rolleyes:

 

Actually starting with post #7 til the end....

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are recoil buffers bad in a Kimber 1911? I have one and it makes it hard to lock back the slide, and I have had a few feeding problems with cheap ammo, should I remove it?

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I don't think they're bad in the Kimber 1911. My buddy has one with a buffer in it and that thing feeds perfectly every time. If he had any problem with any of his weapons he'd just get rid of them. He's not the kind of person who's willing to trust his life to a weapon that may or may not do what it's supposed to.

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I run the BJ buffers in all of my Kalashnikovs and variants plus my FALs, NDM-86, and a few others that I can't recall right now and hI've had 0 (zero) problems with function and reliability. I just wish he'd make one for the M1A/M14, as it's one of my favorites.

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I've been kicking around installing one in my S-12 Mainly for deer slug use.This thing is really kicking my ass with deer slugs,I can't really figure out why,I've shot a truckload of slugs through many differant shotguns and the Saiga seems to have more recoil than any I've ever fired, even single shot break down shotguns Have less recoil.I recently picked up a Grenade launching recoil pad and I'm poing to try to sight in a reddot with slugs for the upcoming deer season tomarrow.

The shotgun has got to take a tremendous pounding with slugs.I'll see how much the pussy pad helps

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on the Tromix website under S12 tips pdf recommends not to install recoil buffer, I would think they are fairly reputable source?

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Holy freaking Necopost Batman! :batman:

Almost 2 years old and this is his second post! :deadhorse:

Edited by MT Predator

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NO TOOLS ARE NEEDED!!!

 

1. Mentaly prepare yourself by looking at the part!!! :lolol::lolol::lolol:

 

2. Slide the front part of the spring forward off the rod.

 

3. Slide the cover forward completely off the rod.

 

4. Install the Buffer.

 

5. Slide the Buffer all the way back.

 

6. Install the cover back on the rod.

 

7. Install the front part of the spring back on the rod.

 

The whole operation should take you less then a minute if you are doing it the first time!!! :super:

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I had the buffer in my first Saiga-12 since before the initial post, 2003…

 

I still do…

 

Every Saiga I own has one…

 

No, I have NOT had any problems…

 

My gas regulator is always set to position 2…

 

I shoot 3-gun matches and do not have time to deal with the gas regulator adjustment "mid-stage", while switching from birdshot to slugs…

 

No, you will NOT make me take it out of my gun…

 

 

red_heart.gifred_heart.gifred_heart.gif BJBs.gif red_heart.gifred_heart.gifred_heart.gif

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Makc has a really good point. ESPECIALLY on an overgassed shotgun (one that runs the crappiest loads and low recoil due to "tweaking" out of spec) you actually SHOULD use one in your gun.

 

I did manage to break one of these by running a couple of 3" shells on accident on gas setting two, however. better the buffer got messed up for ten bucks than the bolt carrier or rear trunion, though....

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I have a much better idea. Why don't we sticky this post in the TRASH CAN in stead? :rolleyes:

 

Actually starting with post #7 til the end....

 

I agree completely.

 

I Installed a buffer on a CETME and it caused a bunch of problems. My trunion cracked, top cover warped and I saw extensive barrel throat erosion, even before I fired it. My pistol grip melted after 2 rounds, it caused my scope to lose zero and the batteries died in my rangefinder. When hiding it would call out to the opposition "He's over here".

 

But that was just the start. That buffer put jello in my fish tank and bounced my checking account. It sent threat letters to the IRS, It made more buffers and put them in all my other guns, It donated money to al qaeda, then invited 20 Jehovah Witnesses over on thanksgiving day. It recorded porn on my kid's Dora movies, and I don't even have children.

 

Needless to say, I removed the buffer from the crumpled mess that was my CETME before returning it to the armorer, they seemed to think it got run over or something, I didn't correct them.

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I have a much better idea. Why don't we sticky this post in the TRASH CAN in stead? :rolleyes:

 

Actually starting with post #7 til the end....

 

I agree completely.

 

I Installed a buffer on a CETME and it caused a bunch of problems. My trunion cracked, top cover warped and I saw extensive barrel throat erosion, even before I fired it. My pistol grip melted after 2 rounds, it caused my scope to lose zero and the batteries died in my rangefinder. When hiding it would call out to the opposition "He's over here".

 

But that was just the start. That buffer put jello in my fish tank and bounced my checking account. It sent threat letters to the IRS, It made more buffers and put them in all my other guns, It donated money to al qaeda, then invited 20 Jehovah Witnesses over on thanksgiving day. It recorded porn on my kid's Dora movies, and I don't even have children.

 

Needless to say, I removed the buffer from the crumpled mess that was my CETME before returning it to the armorer, they seemed to think it got run over or something, I didn't correct them.

 

This post literally made me choke on my snickerdoodle.

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ok, so I think someone needs to machine new bolt carriers that on the left hand side of the carrier, instead of milling that down, leave it at the largest profile that will fit and drill a hole for a long rubber buffer to sit inside the hole, would still alow for full bolt travel, but also allow for a lot of buffer

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