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the killing of a gray wolf pack

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http://usnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/09/29/14151323-killing-of-wolf-pack-criticized-by-key-washington-state-lawmaker?lite&gt1=43001

 

 

Whiners..............

 

 

 

In a letter Friday to the department, Ranker demanded to know:

  • What specific actions the department took before authorizing the kill;
  • Exact costs associated with killing the pack;
  • What actions the department will take to avoid a repeat.

answers

1) clean and sight in guns

2) helicopter ride...$300.00 ammo...$50.00 beer....$25.00

3) see answers 1 and 2

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If they would have let me shoot them I would've payed the 300$ for the helicopter,supplied the bullets and payed for the beer then they wouldn't have to worry about spending.

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Wolves are a problem that city-dwellers have zero clue about. The states have actively lied about the true numbers, roaming size, and behavior of wolf packs. It's a political issue, and there's a fine line to be walked between showing that reintroduction of wolves has been successful, which it has been, and admitting that it's been so successful that pack growth is out of control.

 

Wolves are one of the few animals that kill for sport, something that wolf supporters won't even admit to. They breed at an incredible rate, require massive amounts of meat to survive compared to other predators, and are rapidly wiping out elk and deer herds across the west. Many of them have become dependent upon preying on livestock. Once again, the state and fed governments are in total denial about this.

 

Montana elk herds are down 60% in the last five years, despite a drop in elk tag applications, and a series of mild winters that should have encouraged herd growth. Why? Wolves are picking off young and adult cow elk like nobody's business.

 

Go talk to people in parts of Idaho, Montana, or Wyoming about wolves. In some parts of the state they are scared to go outside at times, have had livestock and pets killed for sport, etc. Hunters have been harassed and stalked while quartering game.

 

I was in Montana last week for hunting and saw two wolves in broad daylight, roaming around open fields near livestock. For an animal that's typically a nocturnal hunter, that's rare, but wolves have balls, and know that many humans won't bother them after decades of being reintroduced under endangered status - at least until the last couple of years.

 

I saw a ton of dog track in the snow while hunting up in the Lewis & Clark National Forest. Thought it was coyotes at first, until I saw those wolves in the lowlands below the forest. After the first day out there seeing all of that track, I never went out again without my pistol.

 

I like wild dogs and am not a dog hunter, but if I had a wolf roaming on my property, you better believe it's going down.

Edited by mancat
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I live in BFE or known to many on the wetside as Stevens County where this pack once operated. As a rural landowner and raiser of livestock I have no problem with the wolves. But I am extremely small potatoes and run my animals on my property.

But some locals who are running their cows on leased state and federal land through the summer have been very outspoken against the wolves. You would think these people are the last independent Americans left by their words but actually what they do is suck at the public tit with the subsidies that keep them in business.

This mentality, coupled with an absolute hatred for the government shared by many in this county swayed/cowered the state wildlife officials to back away from their support of the wedge pack and eventually destroy the alpha wolves.

I understand that once there are sufficient wolf packs operating in their target areas of the state then hunting will occur as it is in Idaho and Montana. With not much luck I may add.

It must be noted that this pack apparently was feasting almost entirely on beef, which makes sense because of the limited stock of wild game and rugged terrain in their area.

I have been seeing evidence of wolves in my area for twenty years and am not afraid though I am always armed and they have yet to bother me. I do think it is exciting to be in the woods and hear their calls, though i am always looking over my shoulder and heeding the wind.

Edited by 49north
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http://usnews.nbcnew...?lite&gt1=43001

 

 

Whiners..............

 

 

 

In a letter Friday to the department, Ranker demanded to know:

  • What specific actions the department took before authorizing the kill;
  • Exact costs associated with killing the pack;
  • What actions the department will take to avoid a repeat.

answers

1) clean and sight in guns

2) helicopter ride...$300.00 ammo...$50.00 beer....$25.00

3) see answers 1 and 2

 

You're off by an order or two of magnitude on the cost of the helicopter ride.

 

If I remember right, the local police helicopters run about $9,000/hour to operate.

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I wasn't trying to be accurate, the reality of it is this.........

 

 

 

The state Fish and Wildlife Departmentspent nearly $77,000 to kill seven wolves in a pack that had been preying on cattle in Stevens County in northeast Washington.

 

Only one wolf was killed in a 39-day ground hunt that cost nearly $55,000. The other six wolves were killed in a four-day period in September using a helicopter and a marksman that cost $22,000.

 

http://www.oregonliv...in_northea.html

Edited by read_the_wall
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Only one wolf was killed in a 39-day ground hunt that cost nearly $55,000. The other six wolves were killed in a four-day period in September using a helicopter and a marksman that cost $22,000.

 

If they paid me $55,000, I hunt them every day of the year....sure I'd get more than one too.

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So he pretends to be concerned with the cost of killing them then bitches b/c "every other option wasnt exhausted first" WTF??

 

Seems killing them SHOULD have been the easiest and cheapest option.

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Only one wolf was killed in a 39-day ground hunt that cost nearly $55,000. The other six wolves were killed in a four-day period in September using a helicopter and a marksman that cost $22,000.

 

If they paid me $55,000, I hunt them every day of the year....sure I'd get more than one too.

 

This is the difference between private industry and govt. in a nutshell. A private company would hire an independent contractor (so he is liable for any screw-ups) for the lowest price and give him a deadline. Since there is actually demand to do the work for free, the state could have flipped it around and auctioned off the chance to do the hunt to cover expenses. Nope, you get to pay taxes on helicopter fuel.

 

I could see cattle association putting up a bounty for the first five wolves in that area too. That would do the trick just fine.

 

I know I would consider similar work a nice way to do a working vacation. I deeply wish that Alaska would reinstate the $5/ seal bounty they used to have. I'd make a 2 week vacation of it and go through a spam can of 7.62x39 and see how much of my airfare I could earn back.

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"I know I would consider similar work a nice way to do a working vacation. I deeply wish that Alaska would reinstate the $5/ seal bounty they used to have. I'd make a 2 week vacation of it and go through a spam can of 7.62x39 and see how much of my airfare I could earn back."

 

 

 

THAT IS JUST MEAN.........big_smile.gif

post-11862-0-69670000-1354419019.jpg

Edited by read_the_wall

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I suppose it also depends how and where the various tree huggers and fish kissers were raised.  Out here in SW Oregon, those who have lived their entire adult lives in this area have a very good understanding of what and what not can hurt, piss you off or kill you in the woods.  Rattlesnakes, skunks, cougars, black bears and now wolves are most definitely NOT on our "touchie feelie" list.

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