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Saiga .308 conversion build notes


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I just finished my first Saiga conversion on my .308 thanks to plenty of threads here, youtube videos, and CSS / Amazon for parts. I used a modified Tapco G2 trigger group, Tapco stock, and a Hogue grip. Just some things I've noticed with my gun that I didn't see in some other threads about conversions.

 

1. I didn't have the rivets in the side of the gun for the original trigger. This also means that I didn't need to buy hole plugs.

2. My gun had the square hole for the pistol grip nut. I was prepared to cut my own but this must have saved me at least an hour.

3. Instead of having three rivets for the original trigger guard I had one rivet at each end and what appears to be two tack welds in the middle. Those two welds were the most time consuming to remove and grind flat. A dremel should be mandatory to do this job properly.

4. CSS said that new holes needed to be drilled for the trigger guard and they were right. Both front and rear needed to be drilled. Conveniently there was a hole in the original trigger guard which didn't go through into the receiver showing exactly where the stock hole should have been. I just marked it and drilled it.

5. I needed to trim the trigger guard for the bolt hold open to fit. I notched one corner about 1/4".

6. Definitely trim the BHO. I cut off maybe 1/8" (just guessing) and wish I went further.

7. My safety lined up and works perfectly. No need to extend it or grind it. I saw this pinned in the .308 forum and was dreading this problem.

 

Overall I'm very happy with it and can't wait to take it to the range. I wish the Tapco stock was a bit longer since the gun is just over 3" shorter from the stock configuration. The Hogue grip feels great and was certainly worth the $20 for me. If anyone else is looking to convert their .308 I'd say check for the spot welds and side rivets and adjust your plan accordingly.

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Maybe I can answer the weld and rivet removal question. I used a dremel with a tapered cone stone (for clearance) to remove the front trigger guard rivet, and for the spot welds on each side. Then used a flat bladed screwdriver to carefully pry bottom plate off. Touch up paint was DupliColor black engine paint, recommended by Dinzag; worked perfectly. See the attached slides to clarify.

 

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Maybe I can answer the weld and rivet removal question. I used a dremel with a tapered cone stone (for clearance) to remove the front trigger guard rivet, and for the spot welds on each side. Then used a flat bladed screwdriver to carefully pry bottom plate off. Touch up paint was DupliColor black engine paint, recommended by Dinzag; worked perfectly. See the attached slides to clarify.

 

attachicon.gifSlide2.JPGattachicon.gifSlide3.JPGattachicon.gifSlide4.JPG

you sir are the man all i'm waiting on now are my parts from css I was gonna order from Dinzag but that 2-4 weeks processing is too long for me

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Yeah the 308's are a little different animal. No other 2 trigger pin things to drill out and therefore no holes there to plug up. Square nut hole already cut (so was my 223 conversion not sure which ones have this and which ones don't). 2 rivets and 2 spot welds on the bottom plate instead of 3 rivets.

 

I drilled the rivets and then ground some when the drill wandered off center and cussed and fussed a lot doing my first conversion (the 308). Then once I had them out I discovered the spot welds. Hopped on here and the suggestion was a sharp straight screwdriver a hammer and patience. So pound and pry away I did until it pulled the nuggets of the welds out of the little plate under the trigger guard. Ground down the remaining weld on the bottom of the receiver with sanding drum on the dremel and went on to bore the holes for bolt on trigger guard from my conversion kit.

 

After doing the 223 conversion and looking back on the 2 I will say that if you lack a drill press (heck maybe even then) i'd really suggest grinding the rivets flush and then punching out the remainder. Only thing I drilled on it was the additional trigger pins and just enough to punch them out. Just use a steady hand and go easy with the power tools so you don't slip grind stuff you don't want to.

 

 

One more note about the 308, the bolt carrier and bolt seem to be a shit load harder to get back in it when you re-assemble. Some people go as far as to tie the trigger down with a twist tie, push the hammer back so its under the disconnector and a little lower.

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I just got a factory standard .308 but I want a pistol grip and new butt stock. Is there is any disadvantage to using the stocks that don't require any modification to the receiver?

 

I've never used one but they seem to be frowned upon here. I'm sure most people will tell you to do it the right way. The main problem is that those kits are expensive (compared to a conversion kit), don't put the grip in the correct spot, and don't change the trigger so you still have a sloppy trigger pull.

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