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Hellraiser79

Tac 47 auto plug install?

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Does anyone on the forums use this plug? If so did it screw in easy for you? I removed my factory plug, cleaned the threads and the tac wont screw in. The threads are fine, I can screw the old plug back in with ease. The inside of the block has been cleaned.... Kinda of stumped, I don't want to force it.

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It won't start or won't screw in all the way? Quiet often the gas blocks are bored off center, or tapped at an angle and the plug won't screw without being reduced in OD.

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Yea your block is bored off center. If you could take a pic it should be easy to confirm this. You can contact Tac47 about getting a modified plug, or if you know a local machinist have them turn down the O.D for you.

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Not exactly what I had in mind. However it does look like your bore is off to one side more than the other. Can you spin the auto plug in as far as possible and take a picture of from the side showing where it's making contact.

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It is most likely hitting the barrel. Just file the barrel down a hair. I had to that to mine to get it to fit. did not take much.

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It is most likely hitting the barrel. Just file the barrel down a hair. I had to that to mine to get it to fit. did not take much.

Modify the plug not the barrel. It's a $50 part versus an $800 barrel. ( meaning you'll have to buy a whole new gun to replace the barrel.) Should you ever find yourself in a position to sell the gun, it will be much easier to sale without a gouged up barrel.

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In most cases the end of the plug would hit first anyway, so the detente is probably safe.

 

OP- do you have a drill press? If so, you can chuck the auto plug in there and hold a file or grinder against it to do a kludge lathe. You can get surprisingly good results this way, especially if you cobble up a rest to hold your tool steady and make your movements controllable. It probably won't take a lot of material removal.

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My brothers plug had very tight threads on his gun. Mine went in no problem on my gun and his plug did as well. On his it wasn't hitting anything, just very tight. Figured it was a Friday close to quitting time gas block. Anyway the fix was to take a tiny amount of rubbing compound and put a thin layer on the autoplug and the inside of the block threads. After screwing in and out a couple of times and cleaning the gunk out it went in like it should have. Trick my grandfather showed me years ago to fix a rusty bolt and nut when you didn't want to buy a new one. People who lived through the depression had all kinds of tricks.

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My brothers plug had very tight threads on his gun. Mine went in no problem on my gun and his plug did as well. On his it wasn't hitting anything, just very tight. Figured it was a Friday close to quitting time gas block. Anyway the fix was to take a tiny amount of rubbing compound and put a thin layer on the autoplug and the inside of the block threads. After screwing in and out a couple of times and cleaning the gunk out it went in like it should have. Trick my grandfather showed me years ago to fix a rusty bolt and nut when you didn't want to buy a new one. People who lived through the depression had all kinds of tricks.

Nothing wrong with using a little lapping compound like you suggested. Just make sure you don't get any inside the gas chamber to start eroding away your puck tolerance! Great simple solution too!

Edited by poolingmyignorance

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My brothers plug had very tight threads on his gun. Mine went in no problem on my gun and his plug did as well. On his it wasn't hitting anything, just very tight. Figured it was a Friday close to quitting time gas block. Anyway the fix was to take a tiny amount of rubbing compound and put a thin layer on the autoplug and the inside of the block threads. After screwing in and out a couple of times and cleaning the gunk out it went in like it should have. Trick my grandfather showed me years ago to fix a rusty bolt and nut when you didn't want to buy a new one. People who lived through the depression had all kinds of tricks. 

 

I have the same issue with my gun and a Tac47 autoplug.  Have ordered a Die to chase the threads on the Tac47 plug.  Mine will screw in one full turn before it binds.  Mine does not show any interference with barrel.  Will follow up after I receive the Die.

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I don't know if any Autoplugs have had bad threads, but there have been plenty of examples where the ruskies were clearly using worn out cutting tools and didn't have full thread depth. I know my IZ-108's muzzle threads were too tight before I wore them in by oiling it up and working the thread protector back and forth with a wrench. I frequently removed it, and cleaned out the debris and re-oiled.. I basically got 5/16" of usable threads by doing this. I was ready to order a die, but the elbow grease method was enough. a few years ago there were several guys who didn't have very good threads in thier gas block, so the guy above isn't the first

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The autoplug does not have bad threads some times the gas block needs to be chased.


We see all kinds of guns and see all kinds of its problems.


We chase the threads with a tap on the gas block and it will clear up your issue right up.

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If you read more closesly, you would see that I haven't had any issues with bad threads on an autoplug. Nothing to clear up.

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If you read more closesly, you would see that I haven't had any issues with bad threads on an autoplug. Nothing to clear up.

 

Not you buddy... for Jeromes info....

jeromes 

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My brothers plug had very tight threads on his gun. Mine went in no problem on my gun and his plug did as well. On his it wasn't hitting anything, just very tight. Figured it was a Friday close to quitting time gas block. Anyway the fix was to take a tiny amount of rubbing compound and put a thin layer on the autoplug and the inside of the block threads. After screwing in and out a couple of times and cleaning the gunk out it went in like it should have. Trick my grandfather showed me years ago to fix a rusty bolt and nut when you didn't want to buy a new one. People who lived through the depression had all kinds of tricks. 

 

I have the same issue with my gun and a Tac47 autoplug.  Have ordered a Die to chase the threads on the Tac47 plug.  Mine will screw in one full turn before it binds.  Mine does not show any interference with barrel.  Will follow up after I receive the Die.

 

Follow up:  The Die helped a little.  Followed bbwps advice of rubbing compound (Used 600 grit lapping compound, from Wheeler Engineering).   Cleaned the threads on both the gas block and the autoplug.  A little oil and then the lapping compound.  Ran it down using adjustable wrench when it really bound up.  In an out a few times and all was fine.  Cleaned off all compound in both the gas block and the autoplug, re-oiled both.  Works like a charm.

 

Side Note:  Out of the five S12's I have access to (mine and other shooters) who in the last 2 wks bought the TAC47 autoplug, only two threaded in with out issue.  The other three required the lapping compound.

 

Anyone looking to purchase the TAC47 autoplug but is concerned with it threading into their gas block should not worry.  It is very easy to match the gas block threads to the autoplug using the technique above.  

 

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My brothers plug had very tight threads on his gun. Mine went in no problem on my gun and his plug did as well. On his it wasn't hitting anything, just very tight. Figured it was a Friday close to quitting time gas block. Anyway the fix was to take a tiny amount of rubbing compound and put a thin layer on the autoplug and the inside of the block threads. After screwing in and out a couple of times and cleaning the gunk out it went in like it should have. Trick my grandfather showed me years ago to fix a rusty bolt and nut when you didn't want to buy a new one. People who lived through the depression had all kinds of tricks. 

 

I have the same issue with my gun and a Tac47 autoplug.  Have ordered a Die to chase the threads on the Tac47 plug.  Mine will screw in one full turn before it binds.  Mine does not show any interference with barrel.  Will follow up after I receive the Die.

 

Follow up:  The Die helped a little.  Followed bbwps advice of rubbing compound (Used 600 grit lapping compound, from Wheeler Engineering).   Cleaned the threads on both the gas block and the autoplug.  A little oil and then the lapping compound.  Ran it down using adjustable wrench when it really bound up.  In an out a few times and all was fine.  Cleaned off all compound in both the gas block and the autoplug, re-oiled both.  Works like a charm.

 

Side Note:  Out of the five S12's I have access to (mine and other shooters) who in the last 2 wks bought the TAC47 autoplug, only two threaded in with out issue.  The other three required the lapping compound.

 

Anyone looking to purchase the TAC47 autoplug but is concerned with it threading into their gas block should not worry.  It is very easy to match the gas block threads to the autoplug using the technique above.  

 

 

I do want to point out that tapping the block really IS the correct way to fix this. The factory plug is matched to the block for ease of installation by their workers. The lapping compound is a fine method, but one other thing to be aware of, is be aware you are lapping BOTH sets of threads, so don't get carried away. It would suck to turn your plug and puck into a projectile! 

Edited by poolingmyignorance

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My brothers plug had very tight threads on his gun. Mine went in no problem on my gun and his plug did as well. On his it wasn't hitting anything, just very tight. Figured it was a Friday close to quitting time gas block. Anyway the fix was to take a tiny amount of rubbing compound and put a thin layer on the autoplug and the inside of the block threads. After screwing in and out a couple of times and cleaning the gunk out it went in like it should have. Trick my grandfather showed me years ago to fix a rusty bolt and nut when you didn't want to buy a new one. People who lived through the depression had all kinds of tricks. 

 

I have the same issue with my gun and a Tac47 autoplug.  Have ordered a Die to chase the threads on the Tac47 plug.  Mine will screw in one full turn before it binds.  Mine does not show any interference with barrel.  Will follow up after I receive the Die.

 

Follow up:  The Die helped a little.  Followed bbwps advice of rubbing compound (Used 600 grit lapping compound, from Wheeler Engineering).   Cleaned the threads on both the gas block and the autoplug.  A little oil and then the lapping compound.  Ran it down using adjustable wrench when it really bound up.  In an out a few times and all was fine.  Cleaned off all compound in both the gas block and the autoplug, re-oiled both.  Works like a charm.

 

Side Note:  Out of the five S12's I have access to (mine and other shooters) who in the last 2 wks bought the TAC47 autoplug, only two threaded in with out issue.  The other three required the lapping compound.

 

Anyone looking to purchase the TAC47 autoplug but is concerned with it threading into their gas block should not worry.  It is very easy to match the gas block threads to the autoplug using the technique above.  

 

 

I do want to point out that tapping the block really IS the correct way to fix this. The factory plug is matched to the block for ease of installation by their workers. The lapping compound is a fine method, but one other thing to be aware of, is be aware you are lapping BOTH sets of threads, so don't get carried away. It would suck to turn your plug and puck into a projectile! 

 

With the lapping compound you are not cutting much metal from either part.  Yes Tapping the block it the correct fix, but most users will not have a 22 x 1 tap.

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I've had the same issue with the new Auto Plug I just received.  My old one fits in both of my Saiga 12's no problem, but the new one was giving me issues on both guns.  However, I put a little Ballistol on the threads and it went in a little easier and locked in.  You can still turn it by hand though, which isn't ideal, but I'm gonna play with it some more.

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