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Looper36

What do you shoot?

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   I had a debate with my buddy about steel vs. lead shot. I've read all the topics on the different pellet counts, dispersion patterns, and velocity differences.

 

Now, I'm primarily concerned about barrel wear. Through my research, lead is far better for barrel life.

 

I simply want to know your opinions and experiences and any advice.

 

So... What do you shoot?

 

Thanks guys.

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I agree that a barrel which has lead shot through it will get much less wear than steel, but with more and more laws limiting the use of lead, you may not have as much choice in the future. I was curious about the Saiga S12 and the Vepr 12 being suitable for steel shot, and was told that the chrome lining in the barrel is very hard, and will handle steel with no problems.

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I don't see how it makes any difference aside from steel being lighter than lead, they should all have a plastic shot cup, and that should be the only thing touching the barrel.

 

You should check out Taofledermaus on youtube, he shoots all kinds of crazy stuff out of his shotgun, I think one time he shot carbide lathe cutters, he's said his barrel is just fine.

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I'm not hunting waterfowl in a steel shot required wetland. So, I prefer lead. What would store better lead or steel? I was always taught you must use a rifled slug in a smooth barrel. What would happen if you used a non rifled slug?

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Irrelevant which material if you are using a shell with a modern shotcup. It does affect choke design and selection though.

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my buddy says steel shot is dangerous cause pressures are higher than with lead...havent corroborated his theory, but sounds reasonable

Why?

 

Plastic shot cup and hard as a t34 chrome lining equals double protection. 

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I'm not hunting waterfowl in a steel shot required wetland. So, I prefer lead. What would store better lead or steel? I was always taught you must use a rifled slug in a smooth barrel. What would happen if you used a non rifled slug?

The rifling on a slug is cosmetic it does nothing to make it spin. Slugs are stablized like a badmitten birdy. By having the weight of the slug up front. If you want a slug to spin you need a rifled barrel. Why would you use steel shot unless your hunting ducks. I don't think most of us have our Saiga's for duck hunting.

Pat

Edited by Alaskapopo

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Or a rifled choke. 

 

The rifling on the slug is not purely cosmetic though. It serves two non-marketing functions. 1 it alllows a small bearing surface to swage through any chokes. 2. It provides a long bearing surface to make the slug track straihght through the barrel. 

 

Older fosters  had rings rather than linear swaging ribs. These also functioned as a gas seal. Many fosters are still designed to obturate and ride the bore.

 

As for pressures for steel vs. lead, that may be true generrally, but there are loads all over the place with either shot type. Moreover, who cares if the pressure is still way under the limits of your gun? Anything SAAMI approved is going to be safe in any SAAMI spec chamber of the same markings.

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my buddy says steel shot is dangerous cause pressures are higher than with lead...havent corroborated his theory, but sounds reasonable

 

 

what is your buddy  smoking?  to come up with that silly nonsense.  lets say,  for the sake of argument,  there is a higher pressure, it's not going to  blow up your shotgun or cause any deformity to the chamber. unless your shotgun is made from "soft steel"

 

ammo manufacturers are not going  to load these shells where it's going to be "dangerous", that is just inviting law suits galore from all over the US and beyond.

 

`

Edited by Matthew Hopkins

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my buddy says steel shot is dangerous cause pressures are higher than with lead...havent corroborated his theory, but sounds reasonable

 

 

what is your buddy  smoking?  to come up with that silly nonsense.  lets say,  for the sake of argument,  there is a higher pressure, it's not going to  blow up your shotgun or cause any deformity to the chamber. unless your shotgun is made from "soft steel"

 

ammo manufacturers are not going  to load these shells where it's going to be "dangerous", that is just inviting law suits galore from all over the US and beyond.

 

`

 

Only thing I can think of is steel doesn't deform as easily as lead potentially causing higher pressures when running out the end of a muzzle or choke. Either way tho, it seems so negligible that its almost absurd.

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my buddy says steel shot is dangerous cause pressures are higher than with lead...havent corroborated his theory, but sounds reasonable

Why?

 

Plastic shot cup and hard as a t34 chrome lining equals double protection. 

 

not concerned with barrel, concerned with barrel exploding

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he typically is shootin older "gentlemans" guns... but also in just generalities, there is no reason to subject your gun to an inferior material. no matter if it can handle it or not...

Edited by saltydecimator

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I'm not hunting waterfowl in a steel shot required wetland. So, I prefer lead. What would store better lead or steel? I was always taught you must use a rifled slug in a smooth barrel. What would happen if you used a non rifled slug?

lead will. chuck hawks said steel will corrode and stick together like a slug... unless thats what you are after

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I'm not hunting waterfowl in a steel shot required wetland. So, I prefer lead. What would store better lead or steel? I was always taught you must use a rifled slug in a smooth barrel. What would happen if you used a non rifled slug?

lead will. chuck hawks said steel will corrode and stick together like a slug... unless thats what you are after

 

 

Yes, it will. My dad bulk bought steel BB 3" mags a long time ago, not knowing one type of ammo from another. After an estimated 20 years, it almost all fired, if you cleaned up the case head enough to load, but seeing the splash in the water, a fair # of them made 1 big splash rather than a splattering pattern. Or sometimes a big splash or two with a few scattered pellets.

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Lead is softer than steel so your barrel length should last longer, but  I do not know anyone who has 'shot out' a shotgun barrel.

Your barrel is not going to explode unless you have some serious issues like a bad headspace or a bullet getting stuck in the barrel and you shooting again.

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he typically is shootin older "gentlemans" guns... but also in just generalities, there is no reason to subject your gun to an inferior material. no matter if it can handle it or not...

What exactly is inferior? Not trying to be argumentative

 

I knew what you meant about the pressure, see post 13. My reply referencing the shot cup and chrome barrel was a general statement about using steel shot in an S12.

I've primarily ran Win Xpert 7.5 1345fps bulk packs (10 or so ) thru mine because that was the cheapest bulk pack (~$23)I could find locally without stepping foot in WalMart. Anyway, it'll still put off the shelf 2-3/4" Sluggers in a 5-6" group at 100 with irons. From my experience and opinion there is nothing to be afraid of by using steel shot, except ricochets  

Edited by Mullet Man

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I prefer lead as it just patterns better. The 3 1/2 mag shells for 12 gauge are an attempt to fix the issues steel shot faces, steel shot must be larger in size to make up for its lower density. The old statement was to go up two sizes, if you used #6 lead shot you must use #4, you also must keep the pellet number roughly equal which means to equal 1 1/8 of lead #6 you must use roughly 1 3/8 of steel #4. And steel will take up a larger area, hence the 3 inch and now the 3 1/2 inch mag 12 gauge shells.

 

Steel also bounces off of objects like trees more then lead. 

 

If steel was available at a lower price then lead I would use it more. Forming steel shot is really not that complex and should be cheaper, lead is $ .93 a pound steel is around $ .085 a pound.

 

Steel rifle bullets would be WAY cheaper.. Sadly they are illegal, unless there is a way to show they are not armor piercing

(The law actually allows for non armor piercing steel ammo if anyone ever figures it out).

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