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chevyman097

What the F&*&^^*!!!!! They want to bring t

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I would find it much easier to agree with you Stryker if trust in our Government officals was a bit more.  They just cant be trusted to do whats right, or smart anymore.  Next thing they will be wanting to do is force you and your children to recieve a vacine they havnt even tested yet.  "oh whats in it? whats the side effects?" just shut up and take it, its mandated.  Used as test subjects? Yes, that is likely what they will be, only test subjects. I wouldnt want my family being locked up where i couldnt see them, being herded around like monkies at a side show.

 

If i knew i was infected with something that could possibly endanger the entire continent I wouldnt want to risk their lives for my own selfishness. If there was a way to ensure the safety of everyone, sure.  There is always risks, but the bottom line is the issues in western Africa arent being handled as they need to be either.  Like already said, the kind of money this country and many others throw away on pointless shit. And we cant even send the propper care and equipment to contain the problems over there.

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Ebola is not just some incurable disease; it is an unstoppable plague of biblical proportions with the potential to very quickly wipe out almost all of the human race if we don't control it. I understand that it is transferred through bodily fluids, including airborne spray, and once you are exposed it has a 90% kill rate. That means one touch, one sneeze or one cough and you are quickly dead. Apparently the virus keeps you alive just long enough to replace your inner organs with virus and spread the to new victims. When you die, your body practically explodes with the virus in the virus's attempt to locate a new host. Oh, and those few survivors may have liquified organs. But that's not all: it is a quickly mutating virus, and researchers are afraid that it could mutate to an airborne virus, meaning you could be infected just be coming into the general area of the virus or one of its victims. Ebola got loose in testing facilities in the US once before, and its close relative, the Marburg virus, did the same in Switzerland. I understand that CDC recently exposed its own workers with anthrax. If you want a quick, entertaining, but scary read on ebola, I suggest "The Hot Zone."

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How do you find the cure? What the fuck are you afraid of?

You find a cure by working where the disease is, not by spreading it to as many places as possible. Unless you believe that the more people who are infected the easier it is to stop the disease.

 

What the fuck am I afraid of? I am certain you already know the answer to that. The same thing any rational person is afraid of when it comes to incurable deadly contagious diseases. But it wasn't a question was it? No, it was a statement. A statement that there are only 2 kinds of people. Those that agree with you, and cowards.

 

But I decline your invitation to an internet argument.

 

From what I've seen from you in the past I would expect better than this.

 

We will have to agree to disagree. Nothing personal. Just pissy about this subject. One of the great things about being an American is that we don't leave our men, women and children in peril. No matter where you are in the world, if you are down your country men will help.

 

No need to argue, just find it odd that people would want to leave americans abroad when they need first world help and medical. That shithole has no advanced labs. Not only that, we need test subjects at labs and hospitals to find a cure or treatment.

 

Nobody has any idea what kind of hazardous materials are flying above us in safe storage containers and NBC equipped aircraft. People with gnarly disease, viruses and lab samples that could wipe out the planet fly on a daily basis without our consent or knowledge.

 

Bringing two home will not spread it around. It's a specialty aircraft with specialist. Too much attention on the transport for them to screw up. Not only will the CDC be watching or conducting. Every alphabet agency will be watching and waiting with emergency measures if something goes wrong.

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Ebola is not just some incurable disease; it is an unstoppable plague of biblical proportions with the potential to very quickly wipe out almost all of the human race if we don't control it. I understand that it is transferred through bodily fluids, including airborne spray, and once you are exposed it has a 90% kill rate. That means one touch, one sneeze or one cough and you are quickly dead. Apparently the virus keeps you alive just long enough to replace your inner organs with virus and spread the to new victims. When you die, your body practically explodes with the virus in the virus's attempt to locate a new host. Oh, and those few survivors may have liquified organs. But that's not all: it is a quickly mutating virus, and researchers are afraid that it could mutate to an airborne virus, meaning you could be infected just be coming into the general area of the virus or one of its victims. Ebola got loose in testing facilities in the US once before, and its close relative, the Marburg virus, did the same in Switzerland. I understand that CDC recently exposed its own workers with anthrax. If you want a quick, entertaining, but scary read on ebola, I suggest "The Hot Zone."

It requires direct contact with sweat, blood, urine, spit. Easier to catch a cold than this. Not that it isn't very deadly. This strain of Ebola kills about 60 per cent of the infected. This strain has an incubation period of up to 21 days that makes it very spooky. You need to close off infected areas from travel at this point.

 

It may have gotten out of the lab here before but it didn't get out the door. The whole world is watching and the medical professionals (the best in the world) will handle this situation just fine.

 

It's not like they can pull a sandy hook on us with every media outlet, spy agency and govenment in the world watching and waiting.

Edited by Stryker0946

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Thanks for updating my dated knowledge, Stryker. I wonder what the workers want. Does anyone know whether they have requested to be returned or whether they prefer to remain in place due to the danger to the US?

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These are Americans!  They deserve to come home to their families and the best possible care in the world.  Also, the CDC needs to study the progression of the virus in vivo at world class facilities; not with a mattress on a dirt floor with baby food jars to collect specimens and no diagnostic equipment.

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I'm more worried about all the people flying out of there to other countries and don't even know they have it. How many of them do you think found out Ebola was running rampant and caught the next flight out, not knowing if they'd made contact or not with an infected. As has been pointed out, with the treatment they have been getting to people and the adaptations of this strain, 60% fatality rate, but that's still a lot of people dead if someone flew out and got to NY or some other major metropolitan area and hadn't shown signs yet

Edited by VR6Shooter

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They are going to great lengths to keep these people isolated. I'm not worried about it. I'm not saying something couldn't happen but I think you do the humanitarian thing while taking every precaution and accept a little bit of risk.

 

http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2014/08/01/how-will-the-ebola-stricken-americans-make-it-home/

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All that needs to happen is for the ebola strain to undergo some sort of mutation, jump from it's host by some unknown and previously unrecognized contact, and bam - instant uncontrolled, incurable epidemic.

 

The thought of bringing these ticking human time bombs into the States is so damn stupid it beggars belief. What the hell can they do for them here anyway? There is no known cure for the disease. I feel for the victims, but you don't expose your citizens of even the remotest chance of exposure.

 

They are being flown in to Dobbins Air Force Base, which is a mere 15 to 20 miles from me. What happens if the plane experiences mechanical failure and crashes? Then you have any potential survivors of the crash exposed, all the first responders exposed, etc etc Wouldn't take long for this shit to get out of hand at all, and then The Walking Dead becomes reality....

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I can understand the concern, but Ebola is actually too hot to create long lasting big infection situations. It flares very quickly, then dies out just as fast. The problem is that it kills practically everybody who catches it.

 

A very nasty way to die also. One literally bleeds to death, very slowly and painfully. No known cure. Perhaps we need to understand that this horrible thing needs to be defeated? Thus the two sick medical people being sent here.

 

Generally speaking I am no big fan of the Federal Government, but in this case the people at the Center For Disease Control are the very best in the world at this sort of thing. And yep...Ebola probably ALREADY is stocked as a weapon.

 

HB of CJ (old coot) Retired Registered Nurse. We need a vaccine. The only way to get that is doing what our Government is doing. This is actually good. Give them a chance to do their job. I think the CDC is one of the white hats here.

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There is too much that can go wrong with this.  I don't trust our gov't to do anything right.  Take our best and brightest to them.  We spend millions every day to fly some gang banging idiot to parties in a flying white house.  I say, we can send ANY technology needed to help our fellow American's without bringing that crap here.

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This is germ warfare by bringing all these infected illegals to the US.  Live carriers are worse than bacterial bombs.

 

This is planned to destroy the US.

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What about the US Marine in the Mexico shit hole?

 

Leave the virus where ever it came from and study it there! Bring home the remains for burial.

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Leave the virus where ever it came from and study it there! Bring home the remains for burial.

 

The CDC already has PLENTY of Ebola strains to study. These Americans should have been given the best possibly medical care available...

 

...in other country. Then again, we could have 5,000 people a day with Ebola pouring over our boarders... Who knows?

 

The remains, meaning the ashes placed in urns, should be brought back home after extensive testing.

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I may be cold hearted but, in this case, the needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few. Those two people CHOSE to go to a foreign country and help people with the Ebola virus. They knew they would be at risk to catch the disease, and they caught it. They knew the risks and should accept the consequences of that choice, and that is to stay where they were and receive aid from us via other means. Bringing them here was not a good idea. 

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The shithole countries they mention in the article have encountered this (off and on) since the beginning of human kind. Have they really not evolved enough to learn how not to spread the disease to each other?

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If you don't have food, and water on hand you better get it. Also head to the store, and get some bleach, masks, some nbc suits. You may also want to buy some plastic sheeting to seal off cracks/AC vents if ever need be. Some people will call you crazy, but screw them if you protect your family it's all that matters. I was going to buy a bunch of hand sanitizer and stuff, but I already have a lot of vodka on hand so I can just use that.

 

This was posted on another site I visit, and I've shared it here for you guys to understand more of what's going on, and take this more seriously.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I am a white guy who lived in Liberia for long stretches between 2010-2012. During this period I managed operations for a mining company operating approximately 60 miles North of Monrovia near a town named Bopolu in Gbarpolu County. Most of my time was spent living out of a mud hut near one of our work sites site deep in the bush. Aside from a few creature comforts including a small generator for a lights, two computers, LAN base station, satellite dish and a few fans to move the air in our huts around, we lived in the same conditions as the 3-4 dozen locals hired from nearby villages.

The climate is subtropical. There are two seasons: The dry season and "The Wet," which runs from May to November. In fact, Monrovia is the wettest capital city in the world. You have never seen rain as heavy as this place. MASSIVE downpours. BIG drops. 

The jungles in the interior are some of the most dense in the world. Not the worst, but right up there.

Once every 2-3 weeks we would drive out of the bush (a painfully arduous trip taking 5-8 hours, often longer) and back to Monrovia for a few days to pick up supplies and "white man food," but aside from this, not much difference. During these trips I got to know Monrovia fairly well.

The two primary languages spoken in Liberia are English and Liberian Kpelle (pronounced Pel-LAY)

High points to consider:

~15 years of civil war ended in 2003 when George Bush sent in the Marines. This opened the door for Nigerian troops to enter, followed by the UN Mission to Liberia (UNMIL). That force remains to this day.

2 civil wars during this 15 year period, quite literally, destroyed the country. While some improvements have been made in the last few years, Monrovia and the country as a whole are still pretty trashed.

Liberia faces significant challenges in this situation as there are *very* few paves roads into the interior of the country. Looking at Liberia in Google Earth, close in, will reveal just how limited they are. Despite this, there are innumerable villages spread throughout the interior.

The lack of roads means a near complete lack of health services outside of larger towns. Need a doctor? Walk, catch a ride on a motor bike or be carried out. There are simply no other options.

The same happens in reverse. Need to get health authorities into the interior? Walk, catch a ride on a motor bike or, if you are lucky, a chopper ride.

At the time I was in country, Samaritan's Purse (part of the Billy Grahm's ministry) was the only humanitarian organization able to operate helicopters. Aside from the occasional mining company performing surveys, the only other aerial traffic one is likely to see are Hind gunships operated by the UN. Most are unarmed and simply used for patrols and to move troops around.

Given the remote nature of most of the country, when people die in the interior, their body is put on display, people from surrounding villages walk for many miles to come and mourn, get drunk, and then the body is buried. 

A man from a nearby village who worked for us died of unknown causes in a distant village. He was extremely well liked by those in the area. We transported the body back to the village in a Toyota land cruiser (west Africa configuration). People came from all over the country into the interior for his funeral. They set his body out on a table of sorts, then proceeded to get collectively hammered. The next morning, his body (left out all night) was found being disassembled by driver ants. Talk about fucked up...

When people die in Monrovia, the hospitals (typically) turn the dead bodies over to the family in a long cloth sack. A large branch of vegetation is stuck in the front and rear bumpers of a car or lorry indicating there is a dead body on board. The locals recognize this and make way. The family puts the body on display, people come and mourn and get drunk on palm wine and local beer. The travailing is quite emotional. Lots of touching of the dead body. Then they find a place to bury the corpse. Often it is done in the bush as many can not afford a plot in a cemetery.

Sanitation in many parts of the city is horrendous when compared to that of developed nations. In the interior, it is standard with the locals to relieve oneself in the rivers. For our mining camp, we had a pit 25 feet deep dug into the hard soil. A mud hut was built over it and local masons spread concrete on the floor and walls. A hole 1 foot in diameter was left over the deep hole. A few feet or water is added, then a few cans of motor oil to form a layer on top to trap odors and keep the flies to a minimum. This is the way it is done.

It is a Liberian tradition to eat from a communal pot with one's unwashed HANDS. We tried for a long time to get those working for us to use utensils. For most, nope. 

As there are no stores in the interior, all that goes into one's mouth is grown, foraged or trapped. Deeper in the bush some still had guns for gathering "bush meat," including grey monkeys and all kinds of 4-legged and winged creatures. Bat soup is a local favorite.

Cassava root (for Foo Foo), rice and loads of greenery and chilies were the main staples.

We once had a HUGE cheetah stalking our camp. We hired two local hunters to deal with it. Two days later they returned with it on a stick. We had them skin it, divide the meat between the 4 closest villages and we kept the pelt. 6 feet from the base of the neck to the start of the tail just above the bung. Thats a big cheetah.

As there is no electricity in the interior, meats and fish (from the same rivers used for relief) are preserved using mud smoke houses.

Corruption is widespread with government officials and law enforcement (common in 3rd world shitholes worldwide). During my time in the country, just getting between Monrovia and the end of the paved roads 20 miles or so out of town required passing through multiple police and interior immigration checkpoints, each requiring some sort of payoff, typically just a few bucks. We actually tracked these expenses as an expected cost of doing business.

----

All of the above is presented in order to help understand why Ebola and other strange diseases can spread so wide and so fast in that part of the world. Inadequate sanitation, lack of concepts in hygiene for the country folk, lack of modern medical facilities in the interior and the general challenge of moving around given the topography. You can not get the sick out easily nor get health workers in easily. Tracing contacts with the infected is literally impossible. The dead are turned over to families (though I suspect this has been halted as of late...). 

Despite all of the above, Liberia is also one of the most fascinating places I have ever been. Were it not for Ebola, I would go back IN. A. HEARTBEAT. if asked. I could not get enough of living in the jungle. Way too cool of an experience. Always interesting. Always challenging. Those into the outdoors can relate.

WATCH FOR CHINA TO APPEAR ON THE EBOLA MAP. West Africa, as with the rest of the continent, has received massive investment by the Chinese government. Along with that money comes large numbers of Chinese nationals.

Edited by netstorm
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If you don't have food, and water on hand you better get it. Also head to the store, and get some bleach, masks, some nbc suits. You may also want to buy some plastic sheeting to seal off cracks/AC vents if ever need be. Some people will call you crazy, but screw them if you protect your family it's all that matters. I was going to buy a bunch of hand sanitizer and stuff, but I already have a lot of vodka on hand so I can just use that.

 

This was posted on another site I visit, and I've shared it here for you guys to understand more of what's going on, and take this more seriously.

 

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

I am a white guy who lived in Liberia for long stretches between 2010-2012. During this period I managed operations for a mining company operating approximately 60 miles North of Monrovia near a town named Bopolu in Gbarpolu County. Most of my time was spent living out of a mud hut near one of our work sites site deep in the bush. Aside from a few creature comforts including a small generator for a lights, two computers, LAN base station, satellite dish and a few fans to move the air in our huts around, we lived in the same conditions as the 3-4 dozen locals hired from nearby villages.

 

The climate is subtropical. There are two seasons: The dry season and "The Wet," which runs from May to November. In fact, Monrovia is the wettest capital city in the world. You have never seen rain as heavy as this place. MASSIVE downpours. BIG drops. 

 

The jungles in the interior are some of the most dense in the world. Not the worst, but right up there.

 

Once every 2-3 weeks we would drive out of the bush (a painfully arduous trip taking 5-8 hours, often longer) and back to Monrovia for a few days to pick up supplies and "white man food," but aside from this, not much difference. During these trips I got to know Monrovia fairly well.

 

The two primary languages spoken in Liberia are English and Liberian Kpelle (pronounced Pel-LAY)

 

High points to consider:

 

~15 years of civil war ended in 2003 when George Bush sent in the Marines. This opened the door for Nigerian troops to enter, followed by the UN Mission to Liberia (UNMIL). That force remains to this day.

 

2 civil wars during this 15 year period, quite literally, destroyed the country. While some improvements have been made in the last few years, Monrovia and the country as a whole are still pretty trashed.

 

Liberia faces significant challenges in this situation as there are *very* few paves roads into the interior of the country. Looking at Liberia in Google Earth, close in, will reveal just how limited they are. Despite this, there are innumerable villages spread throughout the interior.

 

The lack of roads means a near complete lack of health services outside of larger towns. Need a doctor? Walk, catch a ride on a motor bike or be carried out. There are simply no other options.

 

The same happens in reverse. Need to get health authorities into the interior? Walk, catch a ride on a motor bike or, if you are lucky, a chopper ride.

 

At the time I was in country, Samaritan's Purse (part of the Billy Grahm's ministry) was the only humanitarian organization able to operate helicopters. Aside from the occasional mining company performing surveys, the only other aerial traffic one is likely to see are Hind gunships operated by the UN. Most are unarmed and simply used for patrols and to move troops around.

 

Given the remote nature of most of the country, when people die in the interior, their body is put on display, people from surrounding villages walk for many miles to come and mourn, get drunk, and then the body is buried. 

 

A man from a nearby village who worked for us died of unknown causes in a distant village. He was extremely well liked by those in the area. We transported the body back to the village in a Toyota land cruiser (west Africa configuration). People came from all over the country into the interior for his funeral. They set his body out on a table of sorts, then proceeded to get collectively hammered. The next morning, his body (left out all night) was found being disassembled by driver ants. Talk about fucked up...

 

When people die in Monrovia, the hospitals (typically) turn the dead bodies over to the family in a long cloth sack. A large branch of vegetation is stuck in the front and rear bumpers of a car or lorry indicating there is a dead body on board. The locals recognize this and make way. The family puts the body on display, people come and mourn and get drunk on palm wine and local beer. The travailing is quite emotional. Lots of touching of the dead body. Then they find a place to bury the corpse. Often it is done in the bush as many can not afford a plot in a cemetery.

 

Sanitation in many parts of the city is horrendous when compared to that of developed nations. In the interior, it is standard with the locals to relieve oneself in the rivers. For our mining camp, we had a pit 25 feet deep dug into the hard soil. A mud hut was built over it and local masons spread concrete on the floor and walls. A hole 1 foot in diameter was left over the deep hole. A few feet or water is added, then a few cans of motor oil to form a layer on top to trap odors and keep the flies to a minimum. This is the way it is done.

 

It is a Liberian tradition to eat from a communal pot with one's unwashed HANDS. We tried for a long time to get those working for us to use utensils. For most, nope. 

 

As there are no stores in the interior, all that goes into one's mouth is grown, foraged or trapped. Deeper in the bush some still had guns for gathering "bush meat," including grey monkeys and all kinds of 4-legged and winged creatures. Bat soup is a local favorite.

 

Cassava root (for Foo Foo), rice and loads of greenery and chilies were the main staples.

 

We once had a HUGE cheetah stalking our camp. We hired two local hunters to deal with it. Two days later they returned with it on a stick. We had them skin it, divide the meat between the 4 closest villages and we kept the pelt. 6 feet from the base of the neck to the start of the tail just above the bung. Thats a big cheetah.

 

As there is no electricity in the interior, meats and fish (from the same rivers used for relief) are preserved using mud smoke houses.

 

Corruption is widespread with government officials and law enforcement (common in 3rd world shitholes worldwide). During my time in the country, just getting between Monrovia and the end of the paved roads 20 miles or so out of town required passing through multiple police and interior immigration checkpoints, each requiring some sort of payoff, typically just a few bucks. We actually tracked these expenses as an expected cost of doing business.

 

----

 

All of the above is presented in order to help understand why Ebola and other strange diseases can spread so wide and so fast in that part of the world. Inadequate sanitation, lack of concepts in hygiene for the country folk, lack of modern medical facilities in the interior and the general challenge of moving around given the topography. You can not get the sick out easily nor get health workers in easily. Tracing contacts with the infected is literally impossible. The dead are turned over to families (though I suspect this has been halted as of late...). 

 

Despite all of the above, Liberia is also one of the most fascinating places I have ever been. Were it not for Ebola, I would go back IN. A. HEARTBEAT. if asked. I could not get enough of living in the jungle. Way too cool of an experience. Always interesting. Always challenging. Those into the outdoors can relate.

 

WATCH FOR CHINA TO APPEAR ON THE EBOLA MAP. West Africa, as with the rest of the continent, has received massive investment by the Chinese government. Along with that money comes large numbers of Chinese nationals.

Although I know it exists, it's hard to wrap my head around people still living like this.

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Nah, our infrastructure is crumbling but it's still there - even if the grid were to go dark, we'll still have our forged tools and paved roads for a long time to come. Even unmaintained gravel roads last a long time with little human intervention.

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The reason ebola hasn't taken off is that it kills too fast.  The infected don't have much chance to spread it.  In a place like Africa where population densities are low and transportation is slow there isn't much chance to carry the infection to the next village before you die.

 

If it was to start spreading in an environment where population density is much higher and travel is rapid things could change.

 

I don't believe there is some dark plan to spread the infection.  Just stupidity and carelessness is all it takes.

 

Nah, our infrastructure is crumbling but it's still there - even if the grid were to go dark, we'll still have our forged tools and paved roads for a long time to come. Even unmaintained gravel roads last a long time with little human intervention.

What good are roads with no fuel distribution? What good are tools when the tool users are dying of thirst, starvation, and disease?

Edited by Darth Saigus
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It can get shitty, but probably not that shitty. We're all raised and taught germ theory - that's a huge, huge step ahead of much of the third world.


The reason ebola hasn't taken off is that it kills too fast.  The infected don't have much chance to spread it.  In a place like Africa where population densities are low and transportation is slow there isn't much chance to carry the infection to the next village before you die.

 

If it was to start spreading in an environment where population density is much higher and travel is rapid things could change.

 

I don't believe there is some dark plan to spread the infection.  Just stupidity and carelessness is all it takes.

With all the people who are coming back to the US for this conference, it's super concerning - considering the lengthy incubation period of the virus.

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You brought up grid down. When the grid goes down, everything goes down. There won't be fuel distribution or food distribution.

 

Grid down IS that bad.

 

But ebola won't bring the grid down. If a pandemic was to get so bad that the grid came down then then it will be very bad for a long time.

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