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Yesterday, on the way home from work, I decided to stop at the store and grab a few things for dinner.  As I got out of my car, I noticed an old man, on oxygen, with a lady I assume was his wife.  The old guy had a Vietnam Vet cap on, with several hat pins on it.  She got in the car, and he started rolling into the store on an electric scooter.  I didn't see them put anything in the car, so I figured that she may be dropping him off to do some shopping, so I stepped it up to see if he needed any help.  I caught up to him and said "Sir...  thank you for your service".  He looked to me and said "Sir?" as he hadn't heard what I said.  I said again "thank you for your service".  He thanked me for noticing and proceeded to park the scooter.  I walked over to him again and asked if he needed help with anything and he said "naw, I got it, but thank you very much"

 

This brief encounter with a generation that is all but gone touched me.  I was left with the feeling that this gentleman wore his Vietnam Vet hat full of pins with pride and that this man had been to hell and back for this country yet he called me Sir!  I'm not sure many kids these days even know the word.  

 

I will never forget this brief encounter.  Take care of this generation folks.  Take a minute to give them a hand.  It feels good... 

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I had the same experience with a Korean War vet at a produce stand a few weeks ago...great guy! I brought us a round of grape Nehi High from the wash tub ice bath by the check out and we set in shade chatted for a few minutes while our wives picked through the produce.Hard to beat good conversation and cold Nehi High on a hot summer day!

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Thank you for telling us your story John, and for what you did for the Viet Nam Veteran.

 

 

A few weeks ago I came across an old timer sitting in front of a local grocery store in a wheelchair with an oxygen tank, he was smoking a cigarette laugh.png, I just grinned. I noticed too that the ole boy had on a hat which bore the inscription "USS Forrestal CV-59" I said to my wife, "you better get a good look at him, as you may NEVER see another one like him". He was talking to someone on a cell phone and seemed pretty wrapped up in his conversation, he finally glanced my way and  we made eye contact, he knew I was acknowledging him, and he gave me the nod. As Sue and I walked through the grocery store I told her the story of the fire that ravaged the ship at sea, and how so many brave men died while saving her from sinking, and how proud I am that she was my sister ship, as I was a crew member of the USS Saratoga CV-60.

 

NEVER FOREGET................

Edited by AA re-cvrd
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About 15 years ago I was at a bookstore, in the mall, looking at books about WW2 aviation.

 

A much older guy, standing next to me, picks up a book with picture of a bunch of guys in a group photo standing on a carrier deck. Much to my surprise he starts naming the guys in the photo and which guys didn't make it home.

 

He went on to explain that he had flown Wildcats and Corsairs during the war. I told him about my brief time in the USAF and asked to shake his hand.

 

We shook hands, he gave me a crisp salute, did an "about-face" and quickly walked away, trying to hide the emotion on his face.

Edited by Sim_Player
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About 15 years ago I was at a bookstore, in the mall, looking at books about WW2 aviation.

 

A much older guy, standing next to me, picks up a book with picture of a bunch of guys in a group photo standing on a carrier deck. Much to my surprise he starts naming the guys in the photo and which guys didn't make it home.

 

He went on to explain that he had flown Wildcats and Corsairs during the war. I told him about my brief time in the USAF and asked to shake his hand.

 

We shook hands, he gave me a crisp salute, did an "about-face" and quickly walked away, trying to hide the emotion on his face.

That's bad ass...  I'm guessing it wasn't easy to hide yours.

 

Pretty damn cool to hear these stories and maybe this thread will generate more appreciation and kind acts toward this great generation.  Remember guys, they don't have to be vets to do a good thing for our elders.

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That's awesome. Veterans love that you acknowledge that, especially the ones who wear it loud and proud! My father and his brother both served max term Vietnam and he absolutely loves it when people give him thanks and respect.

 

Even a brief 5 second "thank you" makes their day!

Edited by Einstein69

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Right on, John!

 

My Dad was corp of engineers in 'Nam and was fortunate to have never been in bush combat.... When he came back state side, via Kali, he was spit on and called a baby killer... He got that lovely treatment after giving up 3 years of his teens (+1) to a draft paper and obeying the law.

 

The 'nam guys get no respect. It honestly warms my heart to hear this type of story. I wish I could do more for our vets. I do call Dad on every veteran's day and thank him for his service. It's the very least I can do.

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I've had the privilege of talking with vets from WWI on up, and working on their behalf to get them the recognition they deserve. Two meetings stand out, and still choke me up. The first was about 25 years ago, when I had two conversations of about half an hour each with WWI vet Winston Roche. Hearing him talk about being gassed in the Great War was something. At the time, he enjoyed his Corvette a bit too much! I can't believe they are all gone now. 

 

The second occurred at Atlanta's Hartsfield International. I was early for my flight and grabbed a seat at a vacant gate. Eventually, a departure was posted where I was sitting and folks started showing up, but I kept my seat. Soon, an elderly gentleman sat next to me. He was wearing his American Legion cap, although I couldn't see it clearly to read it. I said hello and asked him where he was coming from and going to. I'll never forget this until I die, he said he was coming from Hawaii, "a sad place, a very sad place." I never thought of Hawaii as a sad place, then I looked closely at his cap. It said "Pearl Harbor Survivor" and, "U.S.S. Arizona." Excuse me while I rub some dust out of my eye.

 

I was speechless. What this man had experienced no doubt defies description, let alone most people's understanding. I can't remember much after that. I was in awe. I believe it was Don Stratton.

 

We're free because of the earnest sacrifices of these and countless other men and boys. I try to remember this, and give thanks for this, every single day.

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Saw a rather large, not fat, but thick chest, big arm black man walking out of wally world, had a hat that said something about

some kind of artillery. The date on the hat was 1967 or 68, I asked him if he made big noise with the gun as I thanked him for his service.

He grinned from ear to ear, he was a master gunny, and yes he made the big noise.

 

 

ETA: thanks for the thread, made my day.

Edited by RED333

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Yesterday, on the way home from work, I decided to stop at the store and grab a few things for dinner.  As I got out of my car, I noticed an old man, on oxygen, with a lady I assume was his wife.  The old guy had a Vietnam Vet cap on, with several hat pins on it.  She got in the car, and he started rolling into the store on an electric scooter.  I didn't see them put anything in the car, so I figured that she may be dropping him off to do some shopping, so I stepped it up to see if he needed any help.  I caught up to him and said "Sir...  thank you for your service".  He looked to me and said "Sir?" as he hadn't heard what I said.  I said again "thank you for your service".  He thanked me for noticing and proceeded to park the scooter.  I walked over to him again and asked if he needed help with anything and he said "naw, I got it, but thank you very much"

 

This brief encounter with a generation that is all but gone touched me.  I was left with the feeling that this gentleman wore his Vietnam Vet hat full of pins with pride and that this man had been to hell and back for this country yet he called me Sir!  I'm not sure many kids these days even know the word.  

 

I will never forget this brief encounter.  Take care of this generation folks.  Take a minute to give them a hand.  It feels good... 

You never call an NCO, Sir! They work for a living. :)

 

Best friend is a Vietnam Vet. He taught me many, many things.

 

I work with another Vietnam Vet. He is the salt of the earth.

 

I can't imagine a draft, I volunteered as did my buddy. My co-worker was drafted. Both are Marines.

 

Hoorah from the Grunt. Ohrahh or whatever you Jar Heads say....

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Our Heros are everywhere.

 

They agree to do a thankless job.

 

They wake up everyday and hope that they can go to bed that night.

 

Many thanks to all of our members that serve for the "greater good"!

 

I appreciate you.

Edited by Sim_Player

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About 15 years ago I was at a bookstore, in the mall, looking at books about WW2 aviation.

 

A much older guy, standing next to me, picks up a book with picture of a bunch of guys in a group photo standing on a carrier deck. Much to my surprise he starts naming the guys in the photo and which guys didn't make it home.

 

He went on to explain that he had flown Wildcats and Corsairs during the war. I told him about my brief time in the USAF and asked to shake his hand.

 

We shook hands, he gave me a crisp salute, did an "about-face" and quickly walked away, trying to hide the emotion on his face.

That's bad ass... I'm guessing it wasn't easy to hide yours.

 

Pretty damn cool to hear these stories and maybe this thread will generate more appreciation and kind acts toward this great generation. Remember guys, they don't have to be vets to do a good thing for our elders.

I was in a state of shock, really.

 

The impression that I got was that he was proud but, he didn't want to talk too much. Typical of real vets.

 

I have a buddy that flew a small attack helicopter in Vietnam. He's the same way. He says that "Agent Orange" is the gift that keeps on giving (he's been fighting cancer).

 

My high-school friends dad was in the first F-4 Phantom Squadron to deploy to Vietnam.

 

He had a plaque behind his personal bar with a newspaper article about how they almost got court-marshaled for painting sharks teeth on their planes the night before they left Thailand.

 

His son/my best friend, mailed me (when I was in boot camp) many original black-and-white photos that the pilots took from the cockpit, of each other, enroute to Vietnam.

 

Now, I have to go find them.

 

I lost touch with my friend, over the years.

 

It's really neat, having some kind of connection to our history.

Edited by Sim_Player
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About 15 years ago I was at a bookstore, in the mall, looking at books about WW2 aviation.

 

A much older guy, standing next to me, picks up a book with picture of a bunch of guys in a group photo standing on a carrier deck. Much to my surprise he starts naming the guys in the photo and which guys didn't make it home.

 

He went on to explain that he had flown Wildcats and Corsairs during the war. I told him about my brief time in the USAF and asked to shake his hand.

 

We shook hands, he gave me a crisp salute, did an "about-face" and quickly walked away, trying to hide the emotion on his face.

That's bad ass... I'm guessing it wasn't easy to hide yours.

 

Pretty damn cool to hear these stories and maybe this thread will generate more appreciation and kind acts toward this great generation. Remember guys, they don't have to be vets to do a good thing for our elders.

I was in a state of shock, really.

 

The impression that I got was that he was proud but, he didn't want to talk too much. Typical of real vets.

 

I have a buddy that flew a small attack helicopter in Vietnam. He's the same way. He says that "Agent Orange" is the gift that keeps on giving (he's been fighting cancer).

 

My high-school friends dad was in the first F-4 Phantom Squadron to deploy to Vietnam.

 

He had a plaque behind his personal bar with a newspaper article about how they almost got court-marshaled for painting sharks teeth on their planes the night before they left Thailand.

 

His son/my best friend, mailed me (when I was in boot camp) many original black-and-white photos that the pilots took from the cockpit, of each other, enroute to Vietnam.

 

Now, I have to go find them.

 

I lost touch with my friend, over the years.

 

It's really neat, having some kind of connection to our history.

 

When you find them, would you mind scanning the pics and sharing with us Sim?  

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A lot of my friends are ex-.mil, as am I, and have seen far worse "downrange" than I have. None of them talk about it...except to those of us who have BTDT, then it's not boasting... it's just a quiet voice telling it like it was.

 

If a combat vet tells you something about it, consider it a high honor, as it costs him greatly to tell anyone, especially one who was never there, and will never understand the horrors seen and done, so that we may be Free.

 

Talking to a fellow combat vet is therapeutic, and lays the ghost to rest for a while.

 

NEVER forget, and SUPPORT these proud, wounded heroes. The wounds don't always show, but we ALL have them.

 

ASBVL011.jpg

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These are from the 1974/1975 Med Cruise.

 

 

attachicon.gifUSS_Saratoga_(CV-60)_underway.jpg

 

attachicon.gifuncleDean.jpg

 

attachicon.gif045.jpg

 

attachicon.gif043.jpg

 

attachicon.gif042.jpg

 

attachicon.gif053.jpg

 

attachicon.gif052.jpg

I saw the Saratoga up at OCS in Newport, RI. It's a shame they couldn't pull the funds to make it a museum, I think she has already began to be scrapped or will be in the near future booo.gif

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These are from the 1974/1975 Med Cruise.

 

I saw the Saratoga up at OCS in Newport, RI. It's a shame they couldn't pull the funds to make it a museum, I think she has already began to be scrapped or will be in the near future booo.gif

 

 

I last saw her prolly around 1987-ish, while cruising up the Elizabeth river in my john boat here in Norfolk, she was part of the ghost fleet, prolly razor blades now sad.png

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These are from the 1974/1975 Med Cruise.

 

I saw the Saratoga up at OCS in Newport, RI. It's a shame they couldn't pull the funds to make it a museum, I think she has already began to be scrapped or will be in the near future booo.gif

 

 

I last saw her prolly around 1987-ish, while cruising up the Elizabeth river in my john boat here in Norfolk, she was part of the ghost fleet, prolly razor blades now sad.png

 

Yeah she was a rusted, paint stripped shell of her former self. Anybody want to know why the funds were cut?? I'll give you a hint: sequestration.

 

Some in office felt social programs were in need of gov't money more than DOD, and the Saratoga restoration was one of the first funds axed. I am just happy I got to see her in person.

 

Edited by socom688

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I'm a huge fan of turning these ships into museums.

 

I toured the Midway a couple of times while living in SD and really enjoyed it.

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I'm a huge fan of turning these ships into museums.

 

I toured the Midway a couple of times while living in SD and really enjoyed it.

Me too John, we have the USS Wisconsin here at Norfolk, I love taking the tour every time.

 

post-13516-0-77993600-1409611830.jpg

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I'm a huge fan of turning these ships into museums.

 

I toured the Midway a couple of times while living in SD and really enjoyed it.

Me too John, we have the USS Wisconsin here at Norfolk, I love taking the tour every time.

 

attachicon.gifUss wisconsin_bb1.jpg

 

That would be a cool tour for sure.

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A lot of my friends are ex-.mil, as am I, and have seen far worse "downrange" than I have. None of them talk about it...except to those of us who have BTDT, then it's not boasting... it's just a quiet voice telling it like it was.

 

If a combat vet tells you something about it, consider it a high honor, as it costs him greatly to tell anyone, especially one who was never there, and will never understand the horrors seen and done, so that we may be Free.

 

Talking to a fellow combat vet is therapeutic, and lays the ghost to rest for a while.

 

NEVER forget, and SUPPORT these proud, wounded heroes. The wounds don't always show, but we ALL have them.

 

ASBVL011.jpg

Very well said. Even if the wounds aren't physical, they are definitely there!

Ask a veteran, you'd be shocked to find the one who is willing to share his story.

Pay your respect.

Freedom is not free.

Max years.

M60 gunner.

Boss status.

Live n kickin.

Thank god.

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Met a guy a few weeks ago. I am not affiliated with the military at all, unfortunately. He was.

I RR for a living. he was an FRA guy inspecting our tracks. Competely cool guy! Used to be a Military Cop. Been in many countries. Retired from military.

Lot's of cool stories, really neat guy. Funny as hell!.

When he climbed off our train, I told him "Thank You For Your Service"

I don't think he was expecting that. He said it was appreciated.

Almost like it caught him off gaurd.

I appreciate ALL of our vets. Young or old.

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Bring back the Iowa class battleships! Upfit them with reactors instead of oil burners. The weapons were last upgraded in the 1980s, so will still be useful until upgraded with faster ballistics computers.

 

SCARE the fuck out of our enemies by floating one of them off their fuckin' coast!  We've got LOTS of vets who could teach the young bucks how it works.

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Bring back the Iowa class battleships! Upfit them with reactors instead of oil burners. The weapons were last upgraded in the 1980s, so will still be useful until upgraded with faster ballistics computers.

 

SCARE the fuck out of our enemies by floating one of them off their fuckin' coast!  We've got LOTS of vets who could teach the young bucks how it works.

 

Funny you should say that, as the Wisconsin was fitted with Cruise Missiles....KAAABOOOOOOM muthafukas haha.gif

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