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Garys4598

CzechPoint-USA VZ.58 7.62x39 Rifle

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A few weeks ago I decided to purchase a Czech VZ.58 Rifle in 7.62x39mm.  The question I had to answer for myself was whether I wanted a high-end CzechPoint-USA rifle?  Or, the much less expensive version assembled by Century Arms International, which is referred to as the VZ2008 rifle?  Well.... whenever possible I strive to procure the best, so.... the CzechPoint-USA product it was 018.gif .

 

The following are some of her specifications:

 

The Sa vz.58 in 7.62x39 is manufactured by Czech Small Arms (formerly known as D-Technik) in Jablunka, Czech Republic and includes the following: 
 - chrome lined 16.15 inch barrel with removable muzzle brake
 - high quality barrel manufactured by Lothar Walther in Germany
 - side rail installed, with permanent threadlocker, for use with optic mounts (optic mount not included)
 - semi gloss/matte black finish cured at 300 °F over phosphate
 - TactLite six position collapsible stock utilizing Mil-Spec extension tube with new production polymer injected pistol grip and upper and lower handguard   
 - two 30 round magazines
 - CD containing manual and historical information
 - cleaning kit (does not include oil can)
 - sling
 - 5 year warranty

 

 

Took my new CzechPoint-USA VZ.58 762 rifle to the firing range this afternoon for its baptismal firing session.  It would be a mild understatement to convey how impressed and satisfied that I am with her.  She performed terrifically.  I could not be more pleased!

 

6593817b-a2f5-4f48-91a4-6c92deb84cac_zps

 

37cf92b8-4379-4bc5-998d-8d85181eb39a_zps

 

1437707449_1_ati_stock_side_zpssz5luo5w.

 

1437742699_ati_logo_reduced_zps4to4md8r.

 

 

At this point, the only things that I've done to her is to install an ATI Tactlite Scorpion Recoil buttpad, and a Tactlite Adjustable Cheekrest (which will come in useful, once I mount a red dot optic to the rifle).  Also, before heading out to the firing range I installed a modified aluminum heat shield within the polymer lower handguard.

 

CIMG6092_zpsqarh743f.jpg

 

CIMG6095_zpsjlsc1ex9.jpg

 

 

Today's shooting session was purely about breaking her in and seeing whether any gremlins or hiccups would reveal themselves.  None did and she fired approximately 75 rounds flawlessly.  I'm stoked!

All my rifles have some sort of aiming device mounted to them, whether a magnified scope or a non-magnified red dot.... so shooting this VZ.58 with her simple iron sights was a little out of my comfort zone.  At my age (55) I'm not the best shot without some kind of optic magnification.... nonetheless, I was very pleased with how the rifle grouped at 50 yards (habitually I shoot at 100 yards or farther... but as I mentioned, this shooting session was simply to break the rifle in).

Here are my results at 50 yards, shooting WOLF Performance 123 gr. HP (black box):

 

CIMG6096_zpsifk4eb0e.jpg

 

 

Right now I am not sure what I will ultimately settle upon regarding mounting an optic or red dot on her.  Upon my decision to purchase this rifle, my intention was to mount a Trijicon RMR 1MOA red dot on a BoneSteel/CNC Warrior forend rail, but after having test fitted the one that I recently received onto the rifle.... I'm not liking the gap between the edges of the rail and the rifle's polymer lower handguard.  By 'gap' I'm referring to when looking down upon the rifle, versus viewing it from the side.  I don't like the open space or gap that I see into the lower handguard's barrel channel.  Anyway, this will be something for me to figure out during the near future.

Lastly, I'd like to comment on the rifle's felt recoil.  When firing, it felt.... wonderful!  Whether its attributable to the CSA muzzle brake, or the additional padding provided by the Tactlite Scorpion buttpad, or the short stroke piston (personally, I'm thinking its the short piston design), the rifle's felt recoil was markedly less than my Saiga IZ-240 rifle (5.45x39mm).  This VZ.58 is truly enjoyable to shoot!

~Gary

Edited by Gary
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So many toys, so little money. bad_egg.gif

Tis true,  But this firearm.... is the last Sir.  Made the missus a promise and I intend to keep it.  In fact, I'm selling off a couple of my firearms to make room in my gun vault for this one (I know..... never sell one of your guns!)  The couple that I've picked to sell, I haven't fired in over two years, so... they're gonna hopefully find homes with someone that appreciates them more than I.  wink.png

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Most VZ-58 owners are aware that the options for muzzle brakes are few and far between, due to the 14x1 RH muzzle threading.  I'm one that typically likes to tinker, so.... I came up with the following muzzle brake option for my CSA VZ-58.  It's a TriDelta brake threaded at 14x1 LH, which I attached a CNC Warrior thread adapter to (14x1 RH to 14x1 LH), while also slightly modifying the brake so as to provide for a slightly better aesthetic appearance (my opinion of course).  Using my dremel tool with a cutting bit, I cut-off the back portion of the muzzle brake that had the single alignment indent slot and which was mostly squarish is contour (slot surfaces for wrench use).  That portion removed is depicted in the bottom photo, next to the improvised TriDelta brake.  Overall, I am pleased with how it turned out.... but I'll know more once I take the rifle to the firing range and put a few rounds through it.

 

CIMG6248_zpsw92mkkq7.jpg

 

 

CIMG6247_zpsfb0gkzha.jpg

 

 

Below is the TriDelta adjacent to the CSA original muzzle brake:

 

CIMG6244_zpsnujvr4vx.jpg

 

 

One of the nice aspects of modifying parts is that typically you can get them to fit "precisely."  With the case of this brake, I was able to carefully remove metal material from the bottom/back of the thread adapter by carefully and patiently sanding it on a flat surface, to where it would fit snug up against the front sight block, while also engaging the spring loaded muzzle device indent pin.  There is zero looseness or rattle.

~Gary

Edited by Gary
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I'm curious if you ended up doing anything with that scope rail. Optics mounting is the weak point of these, especially if you are like me and prefer traditional scopes.

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I'm curious if you ended up doing anything with that scope rail. Optics mounting is the weak point of these, especially if you are like me and prefer traditional scopes.

I've already decided to go with a Trijicon 1MOA RMR red dot.  As much as I prefer scopes and the magnification that they provide.... for this particular carbine, I want to keep things simple, light in weight and relatively clean.  I've already replaced the rear sight with Scout Industries VZ Mount with 3.5 inch rail (which I'll cut shorter to provide a cleaner look), that I have a Low-Pro mount attached to, waiting for the RMR red dot..... been saving up $$$ for the Trijicon, they're damned expensive.

 

CIMG6249_zpscptkrkvg.jpg

Edited by Gary
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[As an addition to the continuing saga of getting my VZ.58 rifle to the configuration that I want.]

 

Yesterday, the DHL delivery dude dropped off the following two items (pictured below) at my doorstep, items which came all the way from the Czech Republic.

 

CIMG6260_zps5etv0eq7.jpg

 

CIMG6261_zpsp26ojvvm.jpg

 

The item at left is of course a muzzle brake... sold by GunExpert (out of the Czech Republic) and this particular model is called their 'Extrema Gladiator.'  The gizmo part at right is an aftermarket VZ.58 bolt release lever (which is a drop-in part, replacing my VZ's bolt catch mechanism).  The muzzle device in and of itself is no big deal, other than it is threaded 14x1 metric Right Hand.  Do any of you know just how hard it is to locate this threading pattern for a muzzle device?  The options are extremely few and far between.  Anyway, short of taking my rifle out and testing the Extrema muzzle brake, I am very pleased with its machining quality and appearance.

 

CIMG6251_zpsyrc6vzxi.jpg

 

 

The last mini-project I've got going before I call this rifle "done", is inserting a block underneath the ATI cheek riser to provide the riser adequate support.  To achieve the appropriate eye level to my mounted red dot optic (which has still yet to be procured), I needed to go with the "tall" ATI cheek riser, which.... quite honestly is inadequate in design but exceptionally easy to install and set.  IMHO, it's inadequate with regards to how flimsy the design is; how only the four very small screws affixing the riser to the stock's rear are what holds it into place and is the stress point for all physical pressure placed upon the riser during use.  That will likely make better sense to you once I post before and after photos of the project.

 

~Gary

Edited by Gary
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After months of saving and scrapping $$ together, I finally got around to purchasing the red dot optic that I wanted: a Trijicon RMR (model RM09-C-700304), their 1.0 MOA offering.  The mating of it with the Low-Pro RMR mount and VZ Scout mini-rail seems ideal.  It's absolutely rock solid in place.  I slightly modified the VZ Scout mini mount by cutting-off a wee-bit of its forward length and rounding-off the rear corner edges of the rail, then painting.  For solely aesthetics sake, I would have liked to of mounted the red dot approximately half and inch or more to the rear... but that didn't provide me the ideal clearance for grasping the rifle's charging handle, so the sight is staying where she rests.  (For those familiar with the VZ Scout mini-mount, yes, I'll have to remove the rail portion of the mount any time I want to remove and clean the rifle's gas piston rod.)

 

CIMG6264_zpsh0q1yeos.jpg

 

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Last thing I need to do is complete a small mod to the ATI rear stock cheek riser; I'm fabricating from wood a "support" for underneath the cheek riser which I'll permanently epoxy into place.  I'm not happy with how "flimsy" the cheek riser is when screwed into place; I want to be able to firmly grasp around the stock and cheek riser whenever carrying or manipulating the rifle.... and the four tiny hex-head screws which secures the riser into place at the very rear of the stock, simply are no robust enough (in my opinion).  Anyway, more to follow with pics, once I complete that mod.

~Gary

Edited by Gary
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I'll have to remove the rail portion of the mount any time I want to remove and clean the rifle's gas piston rod.)

 

 

"AK often" or more often than that?

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I'll have to remove the rail portion of the mount any time I want to remove and clean the rifle's gas piston rod.)

 

 

"AK often" or more often than that?

 

I'd absolutely call it "AK often".... thing of it is though, I like to keep my firearms very clean between shooting sessions, so.... That means that I'll likely remove the mount to get at the piston rod to clean it after every session.  The VZ Scout mini-mount is kinda slick the way it removes so, it's not a big deal.  I'll take a few pics of it broken down to give you an idea.  Reinstalling the mount brings the optic back to zero (so the instructions say).... and without actually having done it a few times, I nonetheless believe such to be so (again, that's based solely on how it is removed and reinstalled into its base).

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Here's a photo of the VZ Scout mini-mount's rail removed.  There are four headless hex screws located in the mount's base (one each located directly opposite of the rail's two vertical posts, which keeps the rail locked down into place when the four screws are tightened).  The rail's two mounting vertical posts' tolerances are very snug with the two holes located on top of the VZ Scount mount's base which the posts insert into; the posts have to be aligned perfectly to get them to slide into the two holes (if you catch my meaning).  Then, to ensure that you're returning the optic to zero each time the rail is removed, habitually tighten down the right-side screws first, then the left side.  There are small notches on each side of the rail's two posts (difficult to see in the photo below), which the set screws seat into during tightening.

 

CIMG6268_zpsvejo3sv9.jpg

Edited by Gary
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