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Polishing Question

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Hello All,

 

I am in the process of converting my S-308 and was wondering if anyone had any suggestions on areas to polish for a smoother action. I shot a friends arsenal SGL-21 a couple weeks ago and it was noticeable more smooth when it came to racking the bolt. 

 

I am using Dinzag's deluxe kit and have seen videos from Jim Fuller explaining that you can smooth the action by taking some sand paper to the rails the bolt runs across, the cam lug and area where the cam lug moves in. However I want to check with you guys on here before I do anything. 

 

Thank you, 

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Follow Fuller's lead. You can safely work over the parts by hand with 1000 + grit sand paper, impossible to harm the parts with that method. It's slow as Hell, but if you're nervous about screwing something up that's how I'd do it.

 

You can save some time using a dremel on the worse of the casting lines and lumps, but 1000 grit at the end to smooth it out is where you're heading.

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Same answer.  If you feel the need, start by cleaning up all the mating, sliding or contacting surfaces.  If you just want to start, consider the extractor face and the bottom portion of the bolt face.  Or just do nothing until you get some mileage on the rifle and can see where the contact points are.  Then go very easy with the finest cloth or paper you can find.  Perhaps better to stay away from the hobby powered tools.  They can remove a lot of material too fast.  Hope this helps.

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I would start with 300 grit and call up to 600 good enough. Back it with something thin and flat like a piece of sheet metal or a credit card. Add a bit of oil to wet/dry paper and that will keep it from plugging up.

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Hey everyone thanks for the help! What I ended up doing was using 2000 grip paper and smoothing the rails and lugs on the bolt face like Fuller mentioned in his videos. The action feels a lot smoother, however it might just be me, but if I do not have the metal piece that attaches to the rear of the recoil spring button that keeps the dust cover on, my bolt face gets stuck in the area where it lifts out if that makes sense. I will take some pictures tomorrow. Is this common for the 308 saiga's to need that little buffer at the end to function? 

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I think you might be referring to an aftermarket urethane or nylon buffer. People have strong opinions for and against them. I am mildly for. If you have the tough urethane type and it is not causing problems, it won't cause problems. It does reduce impact between parts. If it is causing problems, then either don't use it, or realize that it means your gun is either gassed very hot or very mild, and could use a little tuning.

 

But give us the pictures to be sure.

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All Saiga 308's come with that metal buffer at the end of the recoil spring. On mine, I changed the recoil rod to the old tube style from a milled AK with the original 308 spring, & a buffer tech buffer. Works great. But yes, every 308 Saiga comes from the factory with a buffer.  GARY

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You need the buffer.  On my .308 with the TWS rail I had to add a Blackjack buffer to TWS' standard recoil spring guide, since the special one with the "dongle" that they offer for the .308 would not work properly.

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This post is very late.  What you can also do is make sure the rifle is not loaded, then simply grind off part of a snap cap rim, place the snap cap into the chamber, then hand rack the action and dry fire about 1000 times.  You will not hurt the rifle.  Be sure to lube it up real heavy first.

 

Removing a portion of a snap cap rim will let the snap cap remain in the chamber.  A cleaning rod will easy pop it out when done.

 

After all that fun, (perhaps taking days) pull down the rifle.  You will see dirty oil where the contact points were.  Clean completely and re lube.  Try the action feel then.  You might sense quite a difference.  Essentially you have hand lapped or worked in the action.  Just another easy way.

 

Ammo expensive.  Snap cap is not.  Elbow grease free.  :)

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