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jerry52

Why does the press use the word hero to describe victims

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Listening to the new this morning about the London bombing and they started to call the victims Hero's.

 

To me a hero is someone who lays it all down for the victims ,I just do not get it, why do they do this?

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Because the sheeple lap it up and can't think for themselves. We really need a cleansing or something that will snap them out of their trance. We are divided, citizens and lemmings.

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Calling them a Hero makes the masses feel like going about their everyday life in todays environment is heroic.

 

And considering this is England and they have to go about their everyday life helpless and unarmed maybe it's got a little truth to it.

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Why? For the same reason the libs want everyone to get a "participation" prize.

 

 

There's nothing heroic about being a victim.

 

Being a hero is continuing on even when you're scared out of your mind, because it's the right thing to do.

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Makes it sounds like a dying in a terror attack is a good thing. You're honorable for towing the party line of cultural marxism.

 

That's the great thing about progressivism:

 

It's self defeating. They'll eventually all be killed and bred out

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So many people lead such drab, meaningless lives that they need to somehow feel uplifted and validated, and they smile and feel proud by simply surviving something that was done to them.

 

The strict definition of a hero is someone who has two choices in front of them. The first choice leads to their personal safety, but does nothing to assist others in peril, and the other is the choice that puts their own personal safety at risk in the attempt to save others who are in peril.

 

I don't in any way think that Chesley Sullenberger, the airline captain of "Miracle on the Hudson" fame, was a hero. Even though his actions saved all aboard the plane, he didn't have an "out" like a parachute (that would have increased his chances for personal safety), but abandoned everyone else in the plane. He had no choice, and the only chance he had to save himself would result in saving the others. What he did was absolutely terrific, skillful, and calm, cool and collected, but it was not heroic. He didn't choose to add to his personal risk in order to save others.

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Doing your job does not make you a hero. A pilots job is delivering people from point A to point B alive.

Soldiers trained to fight are doing their job.

I think it is when someone moves past their job to that sacrifice of life

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The wife just told me maybe this is what trump meant about John McCain. It was part of the job he was trained for.

When you fly in the navy you have to go through training because part of the job may entail being shot down and becoming a POW

Do not get me wrong any POW with some exceptions deserves honor and respect for what they have gone through.

But the real meaning of hero in that situation may be lacking. Unless they went beyond for the safety of others.

I have saved a life, it was training, nothing more. Maybe my instructor was the hero ha ha ha

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I think every POW in the Hanoi Hilton probably went above and beyond what a POW could reasonably be expected to go through, due to the depravity of the enemy.  Don't misunderstand me; I think McCain is a world class douche, but what Trump said that time was bullshit.

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I don't in any way think that Chesley Sullenberger, the airline captain of "Miracle on the Hudson" fame, was a hero. Even though his actions saved all aboard the plane, he didn't have an "out" like a parachute (that would have increased his chances for personal safety), but abandoned everyone else in the plane. He had no choice, and the only chance he had to save himself would result in saving the others. What he did was absolutely terrific, skillful, and calm, cool and collected, but it was not heroic. He didn't choose to add to his personal risk in order to save others.

 

As a pilot I have to respectfully disagree with that statement.  The controllers tried to vector him to attempt landing on dry land, and he chose to ditch it in the Hudson (where he could be sure not to land on anybody) instead.  Maybe they could have made it back to an airport, maybe not, but if not then the population density in that area almost assured that there would have been a lot of people hurt and killed on the ground, even in a crash landing that would have been survivable for many or most of those on board.  Given that up until that time, basically nobody had ever had a water ditching of an airliner go well, he did indeed assume a great deal of additional risk to save innocent lives.  It just happened to turn out that his actions also saved the lives of those on board the airplane, which fell into the category of bonus.

 

Another hero:

 

http://offbeatoregon.com/1207sp-heroic-final-flight-of-jim-wright-howard-hughes-racer-plane.html

 

One of the craftsmen who helped build that plane is a friend of mine, and he spoke very highly of Mr. Wright.

 

Edit to add:  I did some more digging and found that an Aeroflot Tu-124 ditched in a river with no fatalities, and there was a 737 that landed in water that was only knee deep with the loss of one flight attendant.  But in general, modern airliners tend not to do well landing on the water.

Edited by Netpackrat
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I don't in any way think that Chesley Sullenberger, the airline captain of "Miracle on the Hudson" fame, was a hero. Even though his actions saved all aboard the plane, he didn't have an "out" like a parachute (that would have increased his chances for personal safety), but abandoned everyone else in the plane. He had no choice, and the only chance he had to save himself would result in saving the others. What he did was absolutely terrific, skillful, and calm, cool and collected, but it was not heroic. He didn't choose to add to his personal risk in order to save others.

 

As a pilot I have to respectfully disagree with that statement.  The controllers tried to vector him to attempt landing on dry land, and he chose to ditch it in the Hudson (where he could be sure not to land on anybody) instead.  Maybe they could have made it back to an airport, maybe not, but if not then the population density in that area almost assured that there would have been a lot of people hurt and killed on the ground, even in a crash landing that would have been survivable for many or most of those on board.  Given that up until that time, basically nobody had ever had a water ditching of an airliner go well, he did indeed assume a great deal of additional risk to save innocent lives.  It just happened to turn out that his actions also saved the lives of those on board the airplane, which fell into the category of bonus.

 

Another hero:

 

http://offbeatoregon.com/1207sp-heroic-final-flight-of-jim-wright-howard-hughes-racer-plane.html

 

One of the craftsmen who helped build that plane is a friend of mine, and he spoke very highly of Mr. Wright.

 

Edit to add:  I did some more digging and found that an Aeroflot Tu-124 ditched in a river with no fatalities, and there was a 737 that landed in water that was only knee deep with the loss of one flight attendant.  But in general, modern airliners tend not to do well landing on the water.

 

You've provided a broader analysis of other variables, though on a more binary level,Sully did not have the option to flee the situation or, like a firefighter, voluntarily run into the situation. He and his passengers fates were identical and inseparable. I don't see that Sully had the option of, and rejected, a path to personal safety in order to serve others. Self preservation is not heroism, and if the path to self preservation unavoidably provides the collateral benefit of saving others as well, that's not heroism either.

 

The folks on the ground whom he would have overflown, and likely crashed onto, if attempting a return or Teeterboro landing may consider Sully a hero for not imperiling them, but I don't think that Sully thought he would be better off attempting to make either airport, and rejected those choices because of the risk it created to those on the ground. If he had been overflying a densely wooded forest rather than NYC, I think he would still have rejected the airports because coming up short represented certain loss of the aircraft and most if not all aboard. Coming up short over Manhattan is even worse.

 

I have gotten irritated over the debasing of the term hero. To my understanding, a hero is one who rejects a path leading to, or most likely to lead to, their own personal safety in order to aid others. I might also include those who, facing choices that all likely to lead to death, chooses the path of least collateral damage to innocents. This may pertain to Sully and the choice of the Hudson over the airports, but that choice was valid for many reasons, so now we're into weighting factors. He is, though, one hell of a pilot with ice water in his veins, and deserves all the accolades for pulling off the impossible.

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In the end, only the personal definition of hero matters.

 

Your personal definition of hero says far more about you than it does about your heros.

 

Was Sully a hero?  Yes.  Not the charge a machine gun nest with a bayonet kind of hero, but the "make the hard call when lives are on the line" kind of hero.

 

Is a little girl who is blown up by an fanatical demon worshiper a hero?  Of course not.  But the masses only think what they are told to think and it advances the leftist agenda to redefine every snowflake as a hero.

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The press is not in the 'truth' business, and have not been for a very long time. In a nutshell - replacing real words representing stark reality (e.g. horribly maimed and dismembered children) with  sanitized 'fantasy' language (heroes) attempts to redefine, frame, and control  the very origin and context of thought surrounding the circumstances. Hapless victims of terrorism become 'Heroes. Terrorism becomes 'workplace violence', or 'man made disaster', and terrorists themselves are portrayed as 'refugees' and 'victims' of 'violent extremist ideology' (which term is also liberally applied to anyone who does not agree with actual violent leftist ideology). 

 

The aim is simple - control the language and you control the dialog, and even the nature of thought itself.  We used to lampoon the Soviets, Red Chinese, and North Koreans for their brand of communist propaganda and brainwashing. Now that our own press is using these techniques, the effect is particularly chilling.

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Control the language and you control the mind.

 

...and I LOVED it when McCain called Kim that "crazy fat kid". The world laughed, and it cost Kim major face. That was a masterful use of psyop.

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The left is so brainwashed that they call murdered children "heros", and decent people who stand against the murderers "racists".

 

I see people in modern western countries being thrown in prison for merely stating the obvious that islam is a hegemonic terrorist religion.  While muslim "refugees" rape women and children and police and politicians turn a blind eye for fear of being called racist themselves.  Europe is lost. 

 

The leftist indoctrination centers of "education" and "media" have fulfilled their mission.  1984 has finally come to pass.  And it is every bit as surrealistically horrifying as Orwell said it would be.

 

It has driven me nearly to desperation.  It's no wonder I don't sleep. 

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In the end, only the personal definition of hero matters.

 

Your personal definition of hero says far more about you than it does about your heros.

 

Was Sully a hero?  Yes.  Not the charge a machine gun nest with a bayonet kind of hero, but the "make the hard call when lives are on the line" kind of hero.

 

Is a little girl who is blown up by an fanatical demon worshiper a hero?  Of course not.  But the masses only think what they are told to think and it advances the leftist agenda to redefine every snowflake as a hero.

It appears my definition is more strict, perhaps in part due to the rampant overuse of extreme terms. It's similar to the bastardization of the word "unique." There really is no such thing as MOST unique, or MORE unique, simply because unique itself says it all, one-of-a-kind. Only a single item can carry that mantle, the item that has no peers. Mike is right, the media is debasing the very meaning of words.

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You could say journalists are raping and perverting our language to sensationalize the script writers perspective. I believe its otherwise known as writers embellishment...

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You could say journalists are raping and perverting our language to sensationalize the script writers perspective. I believe its otherwise known as writers embellishment...

No, you are mistaken. It's a psyop. We are in a cold war with the Left.

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You could say journalists are raping and perverting our language to sensationalize the script writers perspective. I believe its otherwise known as writers embellishment...

But then it's all about being unique, isn't it? ;)

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