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Question about military scholarships

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Wondering if any of you would know. My son was nominated by our state representative for a military scholarship that would pretty much seal the deal money wise for his college expenses in exchange for service after graduation. My question is are deferments standard options? He's thinking med or pharmacy school first, then service. He has no reservations about serving, but wants his professional doctorate first.

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Just a civilian here, but would the GI Bill funds cover the post-graduate work? Get the 4-yr. degree, do his service, then go for the doctorate on the GI Bill?

Does that work?

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No, because he is receiving the money up front. The Army has offered to pay his medical profession if he commits to 10 years, and he's fine with that. But he wants to do that immediately following his undergrad.

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There used to be programs where the Military would send you to Med school for 6 yrs commitment after graduation. That was 40 years ago, but the Military does not change much,

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Ok, each branch has it's own little quirks, a good recruiter would get him the info, or the overseeing Officer of the program. Different yet give you idea what can be done. My nephew, is graduating in Dec. Went to college on "Baseball Scholarship", now entering dental school via Army in January. Will go to "Officers" 6 week boot camp, and other required trainings during his summer months when not enrolled. 4 year school equals 6 years military. Plus Officer in charge of program, has started process to get him reimbursed for expenses  not covered by scholarship while he earned his Bach. of Science. That is a rough estimated cost, calculated by military. He didn't ask for that, it's what can be done. Could go on, have had other family members and friends go to Service Academies, most went right into specialty outside education, yet did summer service/training, if non summer or year long education required. Medical is a priority. 72 year old uncle went the Air Force Academy route, Air Force chose med school. he became surgeon, they also chose internships, some private, some military. He chose to stay in, yet after retirement, volunteered and was accepted for duty where needed the last decade. In Germany, last 3 years doing initial reconstruction surg. God Speed for your son. 

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From what I have heard from those with something to actually offer the military you can get a better deal if you push for it.

Sure the man thinks 10 years is worth it, to his credit, but seven years in he may think differently as things change with time.

 

The recruiters have some leeway, get it for him if possible.

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My son is currently a chem engineering major in Army ROTC program. The state representative that nominated him said he has to be in ROTC and commit to 4 years to qualify.

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Depending on education/specialty, usually 1 to 1.5 years for every year of education. When already active, then course/education is greatly pushed, long as it fits into service requirement schedule. Your son's situation is close to my nephews, except he already is ROTC/government scholarship. After my service, I was a bit lost, went to collage and found myself helping the ROTC program with field training. Had officer send me to the board for a scholarship, a government agency offered me a job at same time, I left school for them, choices. Not always the best.

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This is a hard way to become a doctor

When Uncle Sam pays he always wins.

Join because you want to serve not to get something. They will have that view.

And remember recruiters lie to get your name on the dotted line.

Good luck

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This is a hard way to become a doctor

When Uncle Sam pays he always wins.

Join because you want to serve not to get something. They will have that view.

And remember recruiters lie to get your name on the dotted line.

Good luck

I joined and got my EE. Not a hard way to do it at all. Serving was a bonus, and I got PAID to go to school as well as serve my Nation. Sure, U.S. won, but so did I.

Freedom has a price. SOME of us are willing to pay it. The rest are along for a free ride.

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I works for many but when your young when it come to the military you need to think it throught.

It's about defending first, if you are able to blend and adapt and get you education great.

But their are a whole lot of them who if they could would go another direction.

You know the ones , always complaining counting the days.

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Okay you got me there however complaining meant you had to much time on your hands ( ha ha)

I guess my point is maybe they should talk to some one who has done what they are planning to do.

I am not against this its just a big commitment for a young person .

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I dunno about medical doctorates, but I shopped around with the branches to see about getting my Juris Doctor. The military lifestyle wasn't for me, but I would have done it wholeheartedly if I signed up.

 

The basic hooks were as follows for the law doctorate:1) Only the Navy would pay the whole way. 2) AF was next best, but paid a lot better so it was probably cash ahead over the course of the job. 3) you had to sign up committed to the Navy for 12 years up front, with no committment from them that your MOS would be JAG, that you would graduate from college, or even get into law school. 4) you had to get a lot of your law school from schools which specifically made most of the program coursework military law, so you would have big holes in your education. The degree wouldn't be comparable to other legal training if you didn't want to work in military law forever. 5) Comparing to simply studying for 4 years of doctorate in the field of one's choice, and then working private sector, most people could pay for the undergrad and doctorate within 6-7 years of graduating, and many much sooner. IMO, it only made sense if you actually loved the idea JAG job and wanted that for a whole career. As such, it is a good deal, but otherwise it was a poor bargain. My stepmother was disappointing that I didn't enlist, but I am not.

 

I've had a couple of friends do similar things taking military medical tracks. About half of them ended up with transferable certifications, and the other half found that their military credentials did not translate to doing comparable medical work in the real world. Those people more or less had to start from near day 1 on education. However, they had a good job for a few years, and had good work while they were getting new medical training on the outside. I think it pays more to look at how real people in the programs fare than to listen to the best case scenario promises of the recruiters. I would not sign up for any military job unless 1) I was okay with the possibility that I could be on latrine detail for my entire service, rather than my preferred MOS, and 2) I am really willing and able to serve as a frontline combat person. 

 

When I looked at what they were offering, I could say yest to #2, but not to #1, given what I wanted to achieve in life. Also, we were entering a war under Clinton, that looked to me like we were on one of the two wrong sides of. I didn't want to be backing one bad guy against another. I passed on that deal. It sounds like your son has a better offer for what he wants to do, but I would read that contract as though he flunks every test along the way and see if he would still want that life.

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Becoming a doctor in these times says a lot about your son.

You must be proud. I hope it will work out for him.

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Extremely proud. He worked his ass off in high school to finish top of his class and is doing the same in college.

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Thank you. Far from great, but we did and continue to try our best everyday. It's hard raising kids, but the thing both my wife and I do that neither of us remembers our parents doing is we share life experience. Basically, we try to arm the kids with knowledge before they go out and repeat our mistakes. So far, so good.

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Responsible honorable US Citizenship earned the hard way and I salute you.  However ... that being said, perhaps it would be an excellent idea to have ANY prior agreement looked over by a civilian attorney.

 

Hopefully a civilian attorney versed in military law.

 

Like Fun Gun already said better, military law and civilian law usually do not mix.  What goes for one does not go for the other.  Promises made, papers signed and military legal orders cut with copies to you.

 

Then 10 minutes later the orders are changed.  Completely.  Oh shit.  This happened very close to home.  Long ago.  Have things changed?  Dunno.  For the good of the service.  Plans up in smoke.

 

Respectfully.

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Remember, the enlistment contract is the last indenture contract , many rights of American Citizenship are suspended or curtailed.

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Remember, the enlistment contract is the last indenture contract , many rights of American Citizenship are suspended or curtailed.

Indeed it is

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Well he accepted the scholarship. He will have options when he graduates so he's currently not locked in to any particular service branch. Right now he's off doing the Ranger Challenge somewhere here in Texas.

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