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Salt1219

what can I use to bond synthetic stocks together?

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I have been wanting to chop down a ati Monte Carlo stock and attach a Mossberg one to the back.

 

Im worried there isn't enough meat for one bolt to hold it all together So do you guys think pvc glue would bond them? Or if you know of another product that would work, what is it?

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Edited by Salt

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I hesitate to say this because of the obvious implications for things OTHER than stocks (and the bad wrap it gets from hack job stuff), but I'd try JB Weld... and I'd try LOTS of it. The success of that would probably depend on what the surfaces are like that you're trying to join. If you can incorporate any sort of metal structure and then just use the glue as a filler you'd probably be good to go for decades.

 

I'll go put my fire suit on now...  002.gif

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I've never used jb weld before and just assumed it was for metal. I might have to test that out

 

I have a spare piece of stock that should be the same material. I just dont want to hack up a good stock and find out what I did wont work. I aslo don't want to make my work look like a total hack job

Edited by Salt

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I'm not overly proud of this, but I have used plenty of JB Weld. There is a time and place for it. It works fantastically on any plastic I've ever applied it to (steel and aluminum too for that matter). In fact, I glued the overflow spout back on to a plastic tank radiator with it 5 years ago and it's been just fine ever since. You're talking 200F temperatures in an oil based environment and a few PSI (maybe 1-2 when the cap vents) of pressure. In that circumstance I had nothing to lose (radiator was worthless with out the spout) but that's my biggest shining example of JB Weld success with plastics. I did NOT expect it to work to begin with, let alone be a lasting repair. So... I'm a believer. I would NOT use it on anything that actually operates a firearm or any other machinery.

 

In the case of you worrying about making a hack job, that's completely in your hands no matter what materials you use. JB Weld does sand/file/machine easily and if you rough it up and primer it correctly it will hold paint just fine and should look as nice as the time you care to invest in making it look nice. I would still recommend building some sort of internal metal brace to actually hold the parts together and provide structure, then just use the JB Weld like a filler.

 

If you don't want to hack up 2 expensive stocks just to play around and learn you could always just start hacking on your wooden stock and make it whatever you want. I can't seem to find it anymore but I saw a guy make a completely awesome Dragunov style wooden stock for his for about $30 and a LOT of time (mostly out of shaped plywood).

Edited by Maxwelhse

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Thank you.

I think you sold me on the idea of trying out jb weld.

I was planning on whatever I used to bond the pieces being just a secondary method of attachment. The first will be bolting them together, using the two together should make a really strong bond.

 

Im not too worried about the hack job look, in that im confident in my ability to make it look nice, I just didn't want to attach it in a ugly way is what I meant.

 

*edit

I contacted atigunstocks and asked them what I can used to bond to them. I'm currious what they will recommend.

Edited by Salt

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Good luck! Just make sure whatever you end up with is plenty strong enough to hold the actual gun in the stock and be safe! smile.png

 

edit: It's also fair to say that someone else might have a better mouse trap. I fully realize how detested JB Weld is around here and usually its with good reason.

Edited by Maxwelhse
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When you use acetone do you lightly paint it on and let it sit for like an hour to soften up?

 

The company website says the plastic they use is chemical resistant... Then again some of the keytone I use at work is very strong we call it mpk (I work for bieing)

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There is a process for welding plastics/synthetic material together. I don't know much about it but I have had it done on a couple of my guns. You might also consider adding some metal backer plates across the connection point for durability.

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When you use acetone do you lightly paint it on and let it sit for like an hour to soften up?

The company website says the plastic they use is chemical resistant... Then again some of the keytone I use at work is very strong we call it mpk (I work for bieing)

First off, I wouldn't use this method for what your doing but here it is anyway. Lol it usually doesn't take long to soften up (but I really throw the acetone to it lol)

 

I have only used it to build boxes, communication device holders, etc. so it's pretty much just straight lines your working with there. But I just poured the acetone in a pan and stuck the ends I needed to bond in it till it started dissolving. then clamp the two pieces together where they needed to be and then come back later to make it look all pertty and such. I doubt this is the proper way but it worked and none of the pieces have come apart yet. Lol now you don't get the best looking bond this way but it was about quantity and speed instead of looks. Check out YouTube. They're some videos on bonding plastics.

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You might try glassing over the seam for added strength.  Rough up the surface, mix some 4:1 epoxy, and lay up a couple layers of fiberglass fabric.  Put some wax paper over top, and give it 24 hours to harden.  Epoxy is easy to paint (easier than nylon, anyway) and can be dyed to match too.  Just be sure it's room temperature or better so the epoxy wets the fabric and cures completely.

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You might try glassing over the seam for added strength.  Rough up the surface, mix some 4:1 epoxy, and lay up a couple layers of fiberglass fabric.  Put some wax paper over top, and give it 24 hours to harden.  Epoxy is easy to paint (easier than nylon, anyway) and can be dyed to match too.  Just be sure it's room temperature or better so the epoxy wets the fabric and cures completely.

Good idea ;-)

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If the stocks are solid then use a double ended screw used to join wood as a reinforcement to the glue.  I used them to join table legs. Double-Ended-Screws-2-.jpg

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If the stocks are solid then use a double ended screw used to join wood as a reinforcement to the glue.  I used them to join table legs. Double-Ended-Screws-2-.jpg

 

I think that concept has merit, but getting the 2 pieces lined up correctly and tightly with that type of fastener would be challenging. The plastic is most likely not as forgiving as wood.

 

I did just have another thought based on sort of the same idea. He could fill the stocks (with JB Weld, fiberglass resin, whatever) at their ends thick enough to accept a counter bore (if they're not solid already), run a thread rod between the 2 parts, install a nut in the counter bore, line everything up, torque the exterior nuts, trim the rod off, fill the counter bores and use whatever filler to smooth the transition and add strength.

 

This will be a fun project to see happen. I think I'd still take the easy way out and just make something out of wood that is already 1 piece. ;)

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If the stocks are solid then use a double ended screw used to join wood as a reinforcement to the glue. I used them to join table legs. Double-Ended-Screws-2-.jpg

 

I think that concept has merit, but getting the 2 pieces lined up correctly and tightly with that type of fastener would be challenging. The plastic is most likely not as forgiving as wood.

 

I did just have another thought based on sort of the same idea. He could fill the stocks (with JB Weld, fiberglass resin, whatever) at their ends thick enough to accept a counter bore (if they're not solid already), run a thread rod between the 2 parts, install a nut in the counter bore, line everything up, torque the exterior nuts, trim the rod off, fill the counter bores and use whatever filler to smooth the transition and add strength.

 

This will be a fun project to see happen. I think I'd still take the easy way out and just make something out of wood that is already 1 piece. ;)

Funny you should mention that,it was my plan to run a bolt through the middle and bond the pieces.

 

I took the gun that I plan to do this to out yesterday. I had just put the bigger scope, the one you see in the picture on and hadn't zeroed it yet. I couldn't see where my shots went to adjust, it was embarrassing. I barrowed my buddies mosin and used his iron sight and hit the paper every time.

 

Anyway maybe not all my improvements are improvements.

Edited by Salt

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If the stocks are solid then use a double ended screw used to join wood as a reinforcement to the glue. I used them to join table legs.

I think that concept has merit, but getting the 2 pieces lined up correctly and tightly with that type of fastener would be challenging. The plastic is most likely not as forgiving as wood.

 

I did just have another thought based on sort of the same idea. He could fill the stocks (with JB Weld, fiberglass resin, whatever) at their ends thick enough to accept a counter bore (if they're not solid already), run a thread rod between the 2 parts, install a nut in the counter bore, line everything up, torque the exterior nuts, trim the rod off, fill the counter bores and use whatever filler to smooth the transition and add strength.

 

This will be a fun project to see happen. I think I'd still take the easy way out and just make something out of wood that is already 1 piece. wink.png

I took the gun that I plan to do this to out yesterday. I had just put the bigger scope, the one you see in the picture on and hadn't zeroed it yet. I couldn't see where my shots went to adjust, it was embarrassing. I barrowed my buddies mosin and used his iron sight and hit the paper every time.

 

Anyway maybe not all my improvements are improvements.

 

 

^^^^^^^^^^^^^this is why we use a laser bore sight, it gets us on the paper and we can fine tune our shots from there. I bought one from my favorite local gun shop for about $50, it's a universal type and fits about any bore from pistols to shotguns  032.gif   This is not something I wanted to spend $50 on, but once I started putting scopes on guns....well this is a no brainer. You can probably find one cheaper than $50.

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^^^^^^^^^^^^^this is why we use a laser bore sight, it gets us on the paper and we can fine tune our shots from there. I bought one from my favorite local gun shop for about $50, it's a universal type and fits about any bore from pistols to shotguns  032.gif   This is not something I wanted to spend $50 on, but once I started putting scopes on guns....well this is a no brainer. You can probably find one cheaper than $50.

 

Its like you read my mind... I've never seen a universal kit that I really liked (seemed too sketchy with all their adapters and such to be reliable... I also don't care for the type that fit in the end of the barrel AT ALL) but I am a fan of dedicated caliber bore lasers. Ironically the last one I bought was 7.62x54R and I think it was around $20 on Amazon. It works awesome and puts out a super bright red dot to at least 400 yards (just guessing my dicking around with it in the chamber pointed at my neighbor's woods).

 

So, yeah... Get a few of those lasers and your scope dial-in will be dramatically quicker.

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