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Barrage

How to fix your dented Saiga 12 barrel

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Since the topic of my other thread was about drilling the gas ports, I felt this topic deserved it's own thread to hopefully make it easier to find for other users should they encounter an issue like mine. Replacing the Saiga 12 barrel is an expensive process and I've found that very few people would be comfortable even attempting it regardless of their fee. Hopefully this will prove valuable to someone in the future.

 

In the process of hammering out the lower dowel pin to remove my gas block to drill the gas ports, I dented my barrel. While the bottom dowel pin was still installed, I was trying to hammer it out with a punch when it was apparently hit with too much force causing the gas block to cant on the barrel which rode the dowel pin up the side of the barrel causing this dent (pictured below)

 

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The dent was approximately 1mm high and the same width. After calling several gunsmiths from around the country for quotes or advice, explaining to them that the dent was in a delicate area (if the barrel were to be bulged slightly during repair, replacing the gas block could prove problematic and create an all-new set of problems). After receiving mostly confusion as to what a Saiga 12 actually was, I decided to take matters in to my own hands.

 

Stumbling around the Internet in search of advice, I found a website that rents gunsmithing tools including the Brownells 12 gauge Dent Raiser tool which costs nearly $500 shipped. This website (of which there is a link to in the following video) charged around $70 shipped to rent the tool for 7 days, which is quite a savings.

 

Here is the video I made shortly following my correction of the dent in the barrel.

 

To use this tool correctly it is to be used as an anvil. Once you have the spacer on the tool set to the end of your barrel with the anvil under the dent, open the hydraulic ledge/anvil until you feel a slight resistance on the dent and can no longer turn the tool within the barrel. I gave mine another 1/2 turn on the hydraulic control to ensure a tight pressure against the dent. Take a small hammer and rap on the dented area on the outside of the barrel being careful not to overdo it, as that could cause major headaches when you attempt to reinstall the gas block. Go slow, and check after every tapping session to see what progress you've made removing the dent.

 

Once you think you have the dent removed, insert the tool again. Raise the hydraulic in the barrel to the point where the tool will just barely turn within the barrel. If you can make a full rotation with the tool inside the barrel with no noticeable resistance in any particular spot then congratulations, you've fixed your barrel. Otherwise, back to tap tap tapping. GO SLOW.

 

Really want to thank you guys on Saiga 12 for participating in helping me drill my ports, hopefully this tidbit will help someone solve their dented barrel in the future. Accidents happen and this was going to be a costly fix, but with the cost of all the tools and rental involved, I went from a possible $3-400 fix (or more depending on installation charge) into about a $100 fix total.

 

Thanks guys.

Edited by Barrage
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Thats pretty interesting bit of information, I wasn't aware there was a barrel undenting tool out there.

 

I passed up a great deal on an over under because of a slight barrel dents before because I thought there was no way to fix it without a new barrel set.

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"you're an idiot, you just did not do it right, don't drag everyone else down with your stupidity"

LOL that was funny. No heat here, man. Glad you got your barrel fixed.

Edited by burntpowder

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Awesome bro I am glad to hear this worked for you. I was thinking all you really needed was to push the dent or breach back outward from the inside. The GB will do the rest for you as far as sealing it up. Great job!

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thanks for sharing the info. That is good work on the solution too.

 

Also, I'll say the same here as I did on the video. I think your thoughts on drilling the pin are sensible, but since you are the only person I have ever heard of denting there, and things like pins can be tricky to drill...

 

I would be more worried about guys who are new to mechanical/ metal work drilling a pin crooked and either drilling through the barrel or block or simply making a thin spot. I am sure a competent person could drill a stubborn pin safely, but competence with things like that is a skill that usually takes a few mistakes to acquire. Maybe not a good idea for the guy who bought his first drill just for the job.

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Thanks for posting the rental site... Similar to jojo, I've passed on some dbl bbl shotguns due to dented barrels. It's not that I didn't know about the tool, but rather that I didn't want to pony up $500 for a new tool. I've looked for used dent removing tools, but I have never found one for a price I was willing to pay... Especially when I don't/won't buy one without having a true need for it.

 

It's real nice to know that I can simply rent one as needed.

Edited by RDSWriter
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Thanks for the replies guys, really hope this will help someone out in the future.

 

I also feel it should be noted that I just shipped the tool back, and with $400 worth of insurance it was $27 to ship it back, just figured that would need to be factored in to the "total rental cost" to those who were interested.

 

All-in-all, I couldn't be more pleased with that tool, I honestly think someone could make a decent collection/penny off of ponying up the $500 for the tool and fixing other peoples barrels, or buying dented shotguns at a discount as mentioned above. MidwayUSA also has a video on how to make a similar tool using allthread and a few easily machined pieces found here. I think the Brownells tool was a little more precise than the one Potterfield is using there, but clearly he can use it just fine.

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I think doing that sort of repair work for other people would be considered gunsmithing to the degree that would require an FFL and some certification/ insurance.

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I think doing that sort of repair work for other people would be considered gunsmithing to the degree that would require an FFL and some certification/ insurance.

 

Ah yes, laws and such. This should show how simple this tool was to use, even I could use it properly and I am clearly not a clever man. :)

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