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Barrel Threading Tutorial


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#1 Cobra's Custom LLC

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 12:40 PM

I hope this will help someone.

Thanks to very helpful fellow member Indyarms I was able to rent a kit for threading the barrels on my .223 and 7.62 Saigas. I will describe here exactly what I did for those who are interested in threading their own barrels. Follow these directions at your own risk.
First obtain a die for cutting 14x1 LH threads (standard AK thread size)
you will also need a TAT (thread alignment tool) in order to cut the threads straight and on plane with the bore.
As most of you are aware the Saiga FSB has a sleeve that extends to the end of the barrel. You must cut this off first before you can thread the barrel.

I used a dremel and small cutoff wheel to cut a shallow line evenly all the way around the sleeve right up next to the sight base.
Others have used a stainless pipe cutter to cut the sleeve but with that method you can not get all the way up to the sight base.
The thickness of the sleeve is a hair over 1/16" on the 7.62 and thinner on the .223.

You may want to wrap your sight base with electrical tape to insure no mars to the finish if you slip.

I used Liquid Wrench penetrating oil to lube the sleeve so it would come off easily. With the muzzle pointed straight up apply some oil to the groove between barrel and sleeve at the muzzle. With a piece of wood (I used my hammer handle) tap sharply on the sides of the sleeve to help the oil penetrate. I did this several times, re-applying oil each time, to make sure it would come off easy.

Cut slowly and evenly, on med to high speed, in a straight line around the sleeve until all the way around. On mine there was already a line to go by but you may have to use some tape as a guide.

Remember it's only a hair over 1/16" deep that you need to make the cut.
DON'T CUT TOO DEEP saigaK!!

I used flatblade screwdriver to insert in the cut and tapped toward the muzzle with a hammer to knock it off. Keep making shallow cuts all the way around and trying to tap it free until it releases. If you use penetrating oil it will slide right off once you are all the way through. On mine one light tap sent it flying off.

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Edited by Cobra 76 two, 12 September 2005 - 11:06 PM.

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#2 Cobra's Custom LLC

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 01:27 PM

After you have the sleeve off you can clean up the cut and straighten if you need to with a small file.

Put the die in the handle(lettered side toward the muzzle)and tighten the holding screws.
install the TAT on the other side by threading it into the die about two full turns. This leaves the bore guide sticking through the die and toward the muzzle. Insert this into the muzzle and you are ready to start threading. You can also thread your brake or hider onto the threads of the TAT and tighten it down against the die to hold it in place.

Place the rifle in a padded vice with the muzzle pointing straight up. I used clean wood blocks.
Tighten securely so it wont twist with the torque of the die. It helps to have a second person around to hold the butt for extra power.

Apply cutting oil to the barrel and die and insert the TAT in the bore. With even downward pressure turn the handles counterclockwise and it will start cutting. Cut slowly with even pressure and stop if you encounter sudden resistance. Back off a little, add more oil, and keep cutting. Do this until you have cut threads almost all the way to the sight base. When you get within 1/8" or so from the sight base back the die off, remove it, and clean the threads. Screw your muzzle attachment onto the barrel as far as it will go. If you are using a brake such as a 74' style, like I used, you need to make sure it is indexed correctly when tightened all the way down. This obviously means with the side ports facing straight out and the holes on the top facing straight up. There are many different types on the market but this is the kind I used. You can rotate the brake on the threads and see how far it goes per revolution. With this in mind cut the threads as close as you can to the sight base and but not too far to index the brake right. (if you go a little bit too far you can always shim it back with a washer) Ideally you want the threads to stop just before it is perfectly upright so you can tighten it into a straight up position. I was lucky and mine indexed perfect with the threads all the way to the sight base.
There are of course other methods such as an indexing nut or a detent pin drilled into the sight block that will snap into the notch in the top of the brake and keep it in place. If you are going to have different brakes you want to interchange then you probably should use one of these methods. For my application I am just going to use threadlocker for now untill I get some different brakes, then I will drill the sight base and put in a spring and pin.

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Edited by Cobra 76 two, 09 September 2005 - 01:36 PM.

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#3 Cobra's Custom LLC

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 01:56 PM

Once I had the barrel threaded all the way down I was ready to install my brake. I screwed it onto the barrel as far as it would go and it stopped about halfway down the threads. :eek:
Took it off and looked inside and sure enough there was a shoulder at the end of the inside threads that was hitting the end of the barrel. This is due to the fact that the sight block on the Saiga is farther back on the barrel than on an AK. Also due to the fact that I bought an el cheapo brake at the gun show lol. Indy has a different brake and he said his didn't have this shoulder so he was able to simply screw it all the way down and let the barrel protrude a little up inside the brake.
Well since the threaded barrels on my S-410 and my S-12 both have a step down at the end of the muzzle with no threads I decided to do the same with the 7.62 and .223.
I screwed the die back onto the threads all the way up to the sight block and drilled a hole in a tin can lid so I could put it on to protect Indy's die. Then with a coarse sanding drum on the rotary tool sanded the first half of the threads off and made the end of my muzzle slightly smaller in diameter so it would fit up inside my brake.
I'm not recomending that anyone else do this but it solved my problem. The best thing to do would be to buy a good brake to start with.

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#4 Cobra's Custom LLC

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 02:12 PM

After I cut the extra threads off I screwed the brake by hand as far as I could and then used a large brass punch to tighten it the rest of the way down. It is very tight on the threads at the end so I wont know untill after I shoot it whether I need to put threadlocker on it to keep it from backing off. My guess is it will heat up and expand and start to unscrew. If so I will put Loctite on the threads and that should hold it good. If that doesn't work either I will go ahead and drill the sight block and install a locking pin. I just don't have one yet or I would have done it anyway.

Well there it is, simple as that. Didn't take long and beats the crap out of using a pin on brake, welding one on permanently, or launching set screw brakes downrange.
Now all I need is a few extra muzzle attachments! :lolol: Always more stuff to buy!

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Edited by Cobra 76 two, 09 September 2005 - 02:15 PM.

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#5 Cobra's Custom LLC

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Posted 15 December 2005 - 02:50 PM

When I did these barrels on my 7.62x39 and my .223 I only had the 74' style brakes and that's all I was interested in. This method worked fine for them but I later got a slant brake and discovered that it would not thread on all the way because of the extended part of the muzzle. If you want to be able to use a slant brake you can not cut the sleeve all the way back to the fsb and grind the threads off the end like I did here. If you want the barrel threaded all the way up to the fsb you will have to thread on a muzzle nut as a spacer and then you can use any brake you want. It may require a nut cut to the right size to index your brake correctly. Since then I have cut my barrel back to 16", recrowned it, and replaced the front sight so this is no longer an issue.
Live and learn.
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#6 BlenderWizard

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Posted 05 May 2007 - 02:32 PM

Man, I just cut the sleeve off of mine... I went a little too far. How deep are the threads?

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#7 moxie1c

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 05:43 PM

Man, I just cut the sleeve off of mine... I went a little too far. How deep are the threads?


I suspect that you only put a minor cut into the barrel. If so, my experience with dies is that they can and will cleanup those little imperfections in the metal. Blender, you should get lucky and not have any trouble with it.

#8 BlenderWizard

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Posted 12 May 2007 - 07:23 PM

Maybe 3/32"

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#9 dyi

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Posted 14 June 2007 - 10:57 PM

Any idea where to get a 223 TAT?

EDIT to answer my own question - Dinzag will make one for anyone needing one.


PS - all you'll do is knarl up the end of the barrel without it

Edited by dyi, 15 June 2007 - 02:38 PM.

2001 EAA 19" S12, pistol grip setup, LRBHO, to send off SBS Form 1 soon
2006 RAA 16" S223, pistol grip setup, M16 mag conversion
2006 RAA 22" S308, Saiganov in-training
2007 RAA 16" S223, AK74 Clone in-training
2007 RAA 16" 762, AKM Clone in-training
2007 RAA 410, Traded for another S12
2007 RAA 410, Bull pup? in-training
2007 RAA 16" 762 Dimpled (build undecided)
2007 RAA 16" 762 Dimpled-Y (build undecided)
2008 RAA 19" S12 conversion in progress
2008 RAA 19" S12 conversion in progress
2009 RAA 16" 545 conversion in progress
2009 RAA 16" 545 conversion in progress
2009 RAA 16" 545 conversion in progress
Lots of non-saigas

#10 killerone

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 08:18 PM

Any idea where to get a 223 TAT?

EDIT to answer my own question - Dinzag will make one for anyone needing one.


PS - all you'll do is knarl up the end of the barrel without it

can this be done to the saiga 308

#11 Messiah Jones

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 08:59 AM

I figured I'd post what little I know about threading a barrel for a muzzle brake or compensator. I hope this isn't redundant, I just figured it may help someone.

For a long time during the "Clinton Assault Weapons Ban" it was illegal to have a threaded muzzle except on pre-ban rifles. Now that the ban is history most people can legally have threaded barrels (check your local and state laws).

There are three sizes of threads used among AKs that I know of. 14mm, 22mm and 24mm. I've never seen a 22mm threaded barrel or brake so I have to assume they are more rare. The 14mm uses left hand threads, but the 24mm uses right hand threads. I'm not sure about the 22mm.

Most muzzle brakes out there were designed for the older style AK-47 threaded barrel. Therefore the most common thread size is 14mm X 1 Left Hand. In order to thread your barrel to 14mm to accomodate these brakes your barrel must be about 0.52" - 0.58" O.D. This diameter barrel is common among military AKs and SKSs. Muzzle diameters vary among manufacturers, especially with commercial AKs. But most of the military AKs will have the correct barrel O.D. to be threaded to 14mm.

The current military issue brakes on the AK-74s are threaded to 24mm. Here are two pictures comparing a 14mm AK-47 brake to a 24mm AK-74 brake.

Top is 14mm AK-47, bottom is 24mm AK-74.

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Left is 24mm AK-74 brake, right is 14mm AK-47 brake.

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Some of the Romanian rifles had their muzzles turned down so that they couldn't be threaded. I had a 2002 SAR-1 that had the correct barrel diameter. I think a little later they started turning them smaller. I don't know how they do it now that the ban expired.

If you want to use the larger 24mm AK-74 style brakes, you have two choices. You can thread your barrel to 14mm LH and get an adaptor to allow the use of the 24mm brake, or you can buy the whole front sight block/threaded sleeve combo.

The adaptor is available here... www.ak-103.com and looks like this.

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The whole front sight block/threaded sleeve combo is at www.k-var.com and looks like this.

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Another issue is plunger pins. The plunger pin is spring loaded and sticks out of the front sight block. It's job is to catch the brake in the groove and ensure that it can't unscrew and fall off. Plunger pins and springs are available at www.k-var.com . In order to install one you must remove the front pin that holds the front sight block on, insert the spring and plunger pin into the hole, and then reinsert the front sight block pin. A commercial AK such as a Saiga, Veper etc. probably won't have the plunger pin hole. Here's what I'm talking about.

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Here's a picture of the plunger pin with a 24mm brake.

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Finally, don't be afraid to thread your barrel. It's very easy. I had never done it before, but I rented a kit and had it done within five minutes without a hitch. Here's what you'll need...

1. Threaded Bore Pilot (TAT)
2. Threading Die
3. Die Handle


... and everything can be found here. http://www.precisein...readingkits.htm or you can rent one from someone online like myself.

Good luck on your project :!:

Tat

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Die

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Handle

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Threading Instructions:

The Threading Kit contains a THREADING ALIGNMENT TOOL (TAT) that is designed specifically to facilitate the creation of threads on the outside of rifle muzzles that are both concentric and perpendicular to the rifled bore.
Your TAT package contains three parts:
1. Threaded Bore Pilot (TAT)
2. Threading Die
3. Die Handle


Warning: Instructions are for right-hand threading. For left-hand threads, turn the opposite direction.

The TAT is simple to use. Even for the inexperienced, the entire procedure should not take more than five to ten minutes. For your safety, follow these directions carefully:

1. Open the action on the rifle and be sure there is no ammunition in the magazine or the bore.
2. The threading die is split along one side and has screw to adjust the die cut for shallow or deep threads. Open up the die to cut shallow threads in order to start the initial threads on the rifle muzzle.
3. Install the threading die into the die handle. Begin with the large chamfered side facing the muzzle. Insert the die into the handle and tighten the retaining screws so that the die will not turn in the handle.
4. Locate the threaded bore pilot (TAT) and insert the pilot into the threaded die so that the pilot, or the unthreaded end, goes into the die from the side opposite the large chamfer. Turn the threaded bore pilot threads two full turns into the die. Use either your muzzle brake or your flash hider as a jam nut to hold the bore pilot in the die. Tighten firmly.
5. If you have assembled the TAT properly as described above, the die now has about three turns available to cut threads on the chamfer side of the die. The TAT is now ready to use.
6. Hold the barrel of your rifle firmly during the threading procedure. A good bench vice with padded jaws is desirable to hold the barrel. You can use soft wood blocks, sheet lead, or copper sheet as padding for the vice jaws.
7. Lubricate both the pilot and die inside of the muzzle with oil. Now insert the lubed pilot into the bore of the muzzle until the die contacts the muzzle. Grasp die handles in both hands and, using some pressure, rotate the handles in a clockwise direction. You will feel the die start to cut. Keep turning the handles slowly. There should be some resistance until the threading dies bottom out on the pilot (above three full turns).
8. WARNING: When you encounter any resistance, STOP! Do not go any further, remove the TAT, then continue threading. With proper threading, the TAT can last for years. Damaged die can be replaced at the regular price.
9. Leave the die attached to the muzzle. You have established a threading pattern that is both concentric and perpendicular to the bore. Loosen the muzzle brake or flash hider that served as a jam nut and remove the threaded pilot from the die. Grasp the die handle again with both hands, turn the handles clockwise until the die bottoms out against the front sight.
10. Now turn the die handles counter-clockwise and remove the die from the rifle muzzle. At this point, you have established the muzzle threads and all you have to do now is deepen the threads so the muzzle brake will screw on. The pilot is no longer necessary.
11. Remove the threading die from the handle and readjust the die a small amount so that the die will cut slightly deeper threads. Install the die back in the handle. Orient the die so that the side with the chamfer again faces the muzzle. Carefully start the die back on the established threads by turning the die handles clockwise. Continue turning the handles until the die bottoms out against the front sight. Unscrew the die.
12. Try to turn the muzzle brake onto the threads that you cut. If the brake will not start onto the treads, repeat Step # 10 above and try again. You want a good tight fit on the threads with some resistance. You may have to repeat the procedure several times.
13. STOP when you are able to turn the brake on the muzzle at least four or five turns with resistance. Remove the brake from the muzzle. Now take the die that is still installed in the handles and turn the die over. The side with the chamfer should be facing you now. Again, carefully start the die onto the established muzzle threads and turn the die handles clockwise until the die bottoms out against the front sight. Unscrew the die from the muzzle. You are now done threading. Clean any thread cutting from the muzzle threads with a soft wire brush and install the muzzle brake until the base butts against the front sight. Make the unit quite tight.

If you have followed the 13 procedure steps above, your muzzle brake is now properly installed and ready for use. GOOD SHOOTING!


ORIGINAL THREAD SIZES

RIFLE CALIBER THREAD SIZE
AR-15, M-16, AR-180 .223 (5.56mm) 1/2x28
AR-15, M-16, AR-180 9mm 1/2x36
Ruger Mini 14 (blue) .223 (5.56mm) 9/16x24
Ruger Mini (stainless) .223 (5.56mm) 9/16x24
Ruger Mini 30 (blue, stl) 7.62x39 5/8x24
HK-91/ G-3 308/ 7.62 15x1
HK-93/ 33/ G-53 .223 (5.56mm) 15x1
HK-94/ MP-5 9mm 9/16x24
US M1/M2 Carabine 30 9/16x24
FN-FAL US Match 308 (7.62) 9/16x24
FN-FAL Para/ SAR-48 308 (7.62) 9/16x24
FN Heavy Barrel 308 (7.62) 11/16x24
STEYER AUG .223 (5.56) 13x1 LH
AKM/ AK-47 0.223 14x1 LH
AKM/ AK-47 7.62x39 14x1 LH
GALIL 308 (7.62) 13x1 RH
GALIL .223 (5.56) 13x1 RH
UZI Carabine/ SMG 9mm 5/8x24
UZI Carabine 0.45
M1A/ M-14 308
L1-A1 308 9/16x24
MAS 1949-56 308 17x1


EDIT:


Here are some pics of my theading jobs. Two of these rifles are converted Saigas and the third is a SAR-1.

The Saigas have a "sleeve" around the muzzle which extends from the front sight. That has to be removed in order to thread the barrel. I tried punching out the pins and hammering the front sight off, but it was so tight it wouldn't budge. I ended up cutting the "sleeve" off of one Saiga with a Dremel tool and cutting disc. That was tedius and ended up crooked, requiring a lot of filing. Finally I looked down and noticed a tool under a bunch of junk and it turned out to be exactly what I needed. A pipe cutter! That made it so much easier.

The Saigas muzzle is longer than other AKs. Don't make the mistake of cutting the sleeve back too far or your brake won't screw on all the way. Figure out how much you brake will screw on and only cut the sleeve back that far. I learned this one the hard way. :roll:

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When you thread the barrel put the kit together like this. Use the brake to firmly hold the TAT in place in the die. It really helps.



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Then you just clamp the rifle in a vice and turn the threading kit counter-clockwise until you've threaded it far enough. Easy as pie.


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#12 Messiah Jones

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Posted 26 January 2008 - 09:03 AM

Be careful how far back you thread the Saiga barrel. Have your brake/flashy on hand before you start because some of them don't thread in as far as the Saiga barrel sticks out from the front sight block. You'll end up with a gap.

Also, you can use an AR-15 crush washer to keep the muzzle attatchment secure.

I have a .223 and 7.62X39 TAT if anyone wants to rent it. Also have the rest of the kit for 14X1 Left Hand.

#13 Leo@VKA

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 03:56 AM

I hope this will help someone.

Thanks to very helpful fellow member Indyarms I was able to rent a kit for threading the barrels on my .223 and 7.62 Saigas. I will describe here exactly what I did for those who are interested in threading their own barrels. Follow these directions at your own risk.
First obtain a die for cutting 14x1 LH threads (standard AK thread size)
you will also need a TAT (thread alignment tool) in order to cut the threads straight and on plane with the bore.
As most of you are aware the Saiga FSB has a sleeve that extends to the end of the barrel. You must cut this off first before you can thread the barrel.

I used a dremel and small cutoff wheel to cut a shallow line evenly all the way around the sleeve right up next to the sight base.
Others have used a stainless pipe cutter to cut the sleeve but with that method you can not get all the way up to the sight base.
The thickness of the sleeve is a hair over 1/16" on the 7.62 and thinner on the .223.

You may want to wrap your sight base with electrical tape to insure no mars to the finish if you slip.

I used Liquid Wrench penetrating oil to lube the sleeve so it would come off easily. With the muzzle pointed straight up apply some oil to the groove between barrel and sleeve at the muzzle. With a piece of wood (I used my hammer handle) tap sharply on the sides of the sleeve to help the oil penetrate. I did this several times, re-applying oil each time, to make sure it would come off easy.

Cut slowly and evenly, on med to high speed, in a straight line around the sleeve until all the way around. On mine there was already a line to go by but you may have to use some tape as a guide.

Remember it's only a hair over 1/16" deep that you need to make the cut.
DON'T CUT TOO DEEP saigaK!!

I used flatblade screwdriver to insert in the cut and tapped toward the muzzle with a hammer to knock it off. Keep making shallow cuts all the way around and trying to tap it free until it releases. If you use penetrating oil it will slide right off once you are all the way through. On mine one light tap sent it flying off.


a slight adaptation to this method,
Cut to a hair less then 1/16, then take a file and make the top and bottom of the sleeve flat.
finally with a 15mm wrench twist the sleeve and the metal will shear at the cut. if it doesn't shear, cut a little more.
Posted Image

#14 Messiah Jones

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Posted 18 February 2008 - 10:47 AM

a slight adaptation to this method,
Cut to a hair less then 1/16, then take a file and make the top and bottom of the sleeve flat.
finally with a 15mm wrench twist the sleeve and the metal will shear at the cut. if it doesn't shear, cut a little more.


Good advice. Luckily I have a very steady hand with the Dremel tool. This adaptation makes more sense and is probably a better way to do it UNLESS you need to save the sleeve. One of my projects is threaded all the way back to the front sight to allow the use of a special brake. I kept the sleeve that was cut off, cleaned it up, and sometimes use it for when I want to change brakes. It's not really important and there's no reason for me to change brakes around except just for the heck of it. I suppose if you marred the sleeve too badly you could make one yourself anyway.

Just a thought. Leo@VKA 's method sounds like a good idea and will protect the barrel.

#15 cYr`

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Posted 02 June 2008 - 07:30 PM

ok. so if i was to make my own muzzle brake what would i use to assure proper alignment w the bore using a tap.. given the threads on the barrel are square ?

#16 DrGonZo

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 04:43 PM

Any idea where to get a 223 TAT?

EDIT to answer my own question - Dinzag will make one for anyone needing one.


PS - all you'll do is knarl up the end of the barrel without it

can this be done to the saiga 308



Talk to Brian at Dinzagarms.com. He should be able to help you out with any and all Saiga questions. :super:
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#17 shootdamoon

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 11:45 AM

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this barrel threading tutorial as it got me through a successful threading job. First ever barrel thread job! However, this was not as easy as the tutorial suggests. Most important thing is you need a LOT of downward pressure to begin the cut. I first started out with the barrel in a vise and applied downward pressure with the threading tool in a counter clock wise direction. It kept turning and not catching. I stripped about 1/8" from the tip of the barrel. This was very frustrating as I spent half an hour trying to get the cut started and going nowhere. So here is what I did. Took the barrel\receiver out of the vise and stood it up on the (padded) floor muzzle facing up. Then attached the threading tool and stood over the barrel and applied my body weight and then began the counter clock wise turn. It instantly caught and began to cut and create the threads. Once it got started I then put it back on the vise and the rest was gravy. Forgot to mention that when you are standing over the muzzel you will use your feet\legs to pinch the receiver so it does not twist as you turn the threading tool on the barrel.

Edited by shootdamoon, 05 May 2010 - 11:53 AM.


#18 Cobra's Custom LLC

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 12:58 PM

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this barrel threading tutorial as it got me through a successful threading job. First ever barrel thread job! However, this was not as easy as the tutorial suggests. Most important thing is you need a LOT of downward pressure to begin the cut. I first started out with the barrel in a vise and applied downward pressure with the threading tool in a counter clock wise direction. It kept turning and not catching. I stripped about 1/8" from the tip of the barrel. This was very frustrating as I spent half an hour trying to get the cut started and going nowhere. So here is what I did. Took the barrel\receiver out of the vise and stood it up on the (padded) floor muzzle facing up. Then attached the threading tool and stood over the barrel and applied my body weight and then began the counter clock wise turn. It instantly caught and began to cut and create the threads. Once it got started I then put it back on the vise and the rest was gravy. Forgot to mention that when you are standing over the muzzel you will use your feet\legs to pinch the receiver so it does not twist as you turn the threading tool on the barrel.


If you go back and read it again, the first thing I said was: "Place the rifle in a padded vice with the muzzle pointing straight up. I used clean wood blocks.
Tighten securely so it wont twist with the torque of the die. It helps to have a second person around to hold the butt for extra power."


The first pic was just to show the sleeve removed and TAT inserted, the second one shows the muzzle pointing up while threading.

Glad it was helpful.

imag036.GIF

 

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#19 shootdamoon

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 04:23 PM

Cobra, thanks for the input. The barrel was originally mounted onto the vise facing up as per tutorial. However, since the vise is mounted on a workbench the muzzle was at about chest high where I could not generate a whole lot of downward pressure. Just thought if anyone else runs into this issue they have an alternative. Also, for those of you who want to attempt to thread a barrel but have no vise this is something you could do.

#20 Cobra's Custom LLC

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Posted 05 May 2010 - 04:39 PM

Ahhh now I understand what you meant. I just have my vice mounted down low on a steel stand, so it was about perfect for this.

imag036.GIF

 

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#21 Buckskin

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Posted 21 May 2010 - 02:01 PM

For those of you when threading the barrel that choose not to thread all the way to the FSB; how are you securing the brake to barrel? Are you using lock tite or what? Thanks in advance.

Buckskin

#22 icefire

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Posted 30 June 2010 - 12:18 AM

Ive got an opposite problem on my x39. I dremeled off the shroud all the way back to the FSB, and bought an extra-deep FH from Dinzag, the Phantom type.

My barrel was factory threaded, but not all the way back to the FSB.

So, should I thread the rest, or just grind down the unthreaded area closest to the FSB, then thread on the FH and use red locktite?

Or try to grind off he threads inside the FH on the inside closest to whee it goes to the FSB?

I would like the look of it going all the way to the FSB if I can pull it off, and the threads inside the FH are deep enough...what do you all think?

Pic attached...

Posted Image

EDIT: Dinzag has offered to bore out the back of my new phantom Flash Hider so it will snug up to the FSB. he Rocks!! I'll post pics when finished, of course..

Edited by icefire, 01 July 2010 - 01:58 PM.


#23 gunnut34

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Posted 10 September 2010 - 08:39 AM

I have cut threads on 2 x39's and had no problems. First time was slow and I kept removing the Die, don't do that the threads get loose, just turn it down and an occasional backing off to break the steel chips. Second time I braced the rifle against the couch and turned it down and it was done. Used locktite and a rubber washer to seal the gap between device and sight. Longer threaded devices are out there to compinsate for the extra threads on the Saiga's.
I have a used twice threading set for sale on the WTS section also.

#24 S3M1-4UT0 BURP

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Posted 17 February 2011 - 06:01 PM

awesome tutorial!

I just did my saiga using this as a guide...excellent COBRA!

.....speaking of which, i no longer need the die, tat and handles...so if anyone wants to purchase them email me or PM me....$110 shipped for everything (cost you about$150-210 new depending where u find them)

olivitog@gmail.com (emails to directly to my phone)

http://www.migunowne...saiga threading

Edited by S3M1-4UT0 BURP, 17 February 2011 - 06:02 PM.


#25 DrThunder88

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Posted 03 March 2011 - 05:42 PM

Great stuff! I finally got around to threading my .223's muzzle and decided to videotape it in case I became a warning to others. Fortunately it came out alright. Thanks for the walkthrough!


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#26 alex e

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 07:33 PM

Dr. T....did you rent your 14x1LH die and die handle/TAT?

Sure would hate to buy one of these setups to use ONCE...............


Well I bought the entire kit from CNC Warrior, all in, including cutting oil, for $55.


Anyone wanna rent it after I'm done?

Edited by alex e, 05 March 2011 - 07:39 PM.


#27 DrThunder88

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Posted 05 March 2011 - 10:10 PM

The only way to defray that initial cost is to buy more Saigas! I did have to buy my gear for this project (except the die stock, which I already own), but I do plan on threading my backordered 7.62 Saiga whenever it gets in. If it get in, I should say.

Edited by DrThunder88, 05 March 2011 - 10:12 PM.


#28 alex e

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Posted 06 March 2011 - 02:25 AM

The only way to defray that initial cost is to buy more Saigas! I did have to buy my gear for this project (except the die stock, which I already own), but I do plan on threading my backordered 7.62 Saiga whenever it gets in. If it get in, I should say.


One of my hunting buddies offered me $750 this evening for the Saiga and I've never fired it.......gonna let him have it and probably buy another in .308.

Sans FSC47 and the TWS Dogleg, but ready to shoot:


Posted Image

Posted Image

#29 alex e

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Posted 06 March 2011 - 01:39 PM

I need to get my thoughts straight on how to set up the TAT, how deep to thread it into the die when getting started......

#30 josey88

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Posted 07 March 2011 - 07:42 PM

I was watching drThunder88`s video and I was on the same boat last week... I was about to thread the barrel of my 20" Saiga . I gathered the tools needed , the Tat , the 14 to1 LH Die and the handle plus oil. I began the thing , but the Die would not make threads ; instead it would eat away the metal on the barrel, After 1/4" I stopped. Since I didn`t know what was going on I ended up on a gunsmith shop . He explained to me that my barrel was thicker than usual (it is one of the unusual .0591" barrels made in small quantities thicker than the regular .0571" , and of course with my luck I ended up having one) and the barrel had to be reduced in order to be able to thread it at 14 to 1 . Cost me $45.00 , which is not too bad , and had it done professionally . Done thing. After all, I think I like having a thicker barrel anyway . But I strongly suggest that before you attemp to do the threading , get a caliper and measure the barrel , to avoid complications. If the barrel is a regular size , go ahead . If the barrel is thicker, go straight to a gunsmith .

Edited by josey88, 07 March 2011 - 07:46 PM.

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